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Active learning using adaptable task-based prioritisation

Saeed, Shaheer U; Ramalhinho, João; Pinnock, Mark; Shen, Ziyi; Fu, Yunguan; Montaña-Brown, Nina; Bonmati, Ester; ... Hu, Yipeng; + view all (2024) Active learning using adaptable task-based prioritisation. Medical Image Analysis , 95 , Article 103181. 10.1016/j.media.2024.103181. Green open access

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Abstract

Supervised machine learning-based medical image computing applications necessitate expert label curation, while unlabelled image data might be relatively abundant. Active learning methods aim to prioritise a subset of available image data for expert annotation, for label-efficient model training. We develop a controller neural network that measures priority of images in a sequence of batches, as in batch-mode active learning, for multi-class segmentation tasks. The controller is optimised by rewarding positive task-specific performance gain, within a Markov decision process (MDP) environment that also optimises the task predictor. In this work, the task predictor is a segmentation network. A meta-reinforcement learning algorithm is proposed with multiple MDPs, such that the pre-trained controller can be adapted to a new MDP that contains data from different institutes and/or requires segmentation of different organs or structures within the abdomen. We present experimental results using multiple CT datasets from more than one thousand patients, with segmentation tasks of nine different abdominal organs, to demonstrate the efficacy of the learnt prioritisation controller function and its cross-institute and cross-organ adaptability. We show that the proposed adaptable prioritisation metric yields converging segmentation accuracy for a new kidney segmentation task, unseen in training, using between approximately 40% to 60% of labels otherwise required with other heuristic or random prioritisation metrics. For clinical datasets of limited size, the proposed adaptable prioritisation offers a performance improvement of 22.6% and 10.2% in Dice score, for tasks of kidney and liver vessel segmentation, respectively, compared to random prioritisation and alternative active sampling strategies.

Type: Article
Title: Active learning using adaptable task-based prioritisation
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.media.2024.103181
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.media.2024.103181
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2024 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Active Learning, Medical Image Quality, Segmentation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10191174
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