UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Post-Neolithic broadening of agriculture in Yunnan, China: Archaeobotanical evidence from Haimenkou

Xue, Y; Dal Martello, R; Qin, L; Stevens, CJ; Min, R; Fuller, DQ; (2022) Post-Neolithic broadening of agriculture in Yunnan, China: Archaeobotanical evidence from Haimenkou. Archaeological Research in Asia , 30 , Article 100364. 10.1016/j.ara.2022.100364.

[thumbnail of Xue et al_Haimenkou Broadening of Agriculture_manuscript.pdf] Text
Xue et al_Haimenkou Broadening of Agriculture_manuscript.pdf - Accepted Version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 6 March 2024.

Download (2MB)

Abstract

We report archaeobotanical results from systematic flotation obtained during the 2008 excavation of the site of Haimenkou, in Northwest Yunnan, dated to c. 1600–300 BCE. Haimenkou is thus far the largest prehistoric settlement excavated in Yunnan, its long occupation across the second and first millennium BCE bridges a gap from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age, and its location close to bronze smelting sites and the core area of the 1st millennium BCE polity of the Dian makes it an important site to investigate the early development of the province. It is also the earliest site with evidence for wheat and barley in Yunnan and provides essential data for tracing the spread of the two crops into Yunnan, as well as for understanding the agricultural production developments in the province from the second millennium BCE onward. People at Haimenkou were practicing a mixed-crop farming strategy based first on rice and millet, and with the addition of wheat from c. 1450 BCE. Between c. 800–300 BCE archaeobotanical remains attests to a general decrease of millet and rice production in favour of wheat, possibly linked with a drying climate. Other important cultivars present include large quantities of Chenopodium (associated with other cereal crops remains such as rice and millets), Perilla (Shisoo) seeds, and a few grains of buckwheat, all possibly utilized as crops. Additionally, Cannabis seeds have also been retrieved. Several fruits species feature in the assemblage, including peaches (Amygdalus persica), apricots (Armeniaca vulgaris), although these are present in minor quantity in relation to crops and might indicate that local plant resource collection had a secondary role to crop cultivation.

Type: Article
Title: Post-Neolithic broadening of agriculture in Yunnan, China: Archaeobotanical evidence from Haimenkou
DOI: 10.1016/j.ara.2022.100364
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2022.100364
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Paleoethnobotany, Wheat, Buckwheat, Bronze age, Domestication, Yunnan
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10146831
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item