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Prevention of cardiovascular disease: why do we neglect the most potent intervention?

Stamatakis, E; Weiler, R; (2010) Prevention of cardiovascular disease: why do we neglect the most potent intervention? HEART , 96 (4) 261 - 262. 10.1136/hrt.2009.186593. Green open access

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Abstract

Despite a large volume of evidence supporting its cardioprotective properties and its other numerous established health benefits, physical activity is not a serious prescription option for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, health services increasingly focus on pharmacological prevention without considering properly the long-term consequences of medication. Ethical and feasibility considerations suggest that evidence on the protective value of physical activity may need to be evaluated using criteria different from those applying to pharmacological trials. The collateral health benefits of physical activity prescription support its use as standard option in preventive health care.

Type: Article
Title: Prevention of cardiovascular disease: why do we neglect the most potent intervention?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/hrt.2009.186593
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2009.186593
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
Keywords: PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, HEART-DISEASE, FOLLOW-UP, MORTALITY, TRIALS, TIME
UCL classification: UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/77680
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