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Trouble sources and repair in acquired dysarthria and communication aid use: A conversation analysis study

Bloch, S; (2006) Trouble sources and repair in acquired dysarthria and communication aid use: A conversation analysis study. Doctoral thesis , UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

A common symptom of acquired progressive neurological conditions like Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is deterioration in the neurological control of physical speech production. This is termed ‘dysarthria’. People with progressive dysarthria can thus experience deterioration in speech intelligibility and may, ultimately, be unable to use speech as a primary modality for communication, relying instead on the use of an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) system to compensate for the progressive speech deterioration. Previous dysarthria research has examined this deterioration as a largely physical phenomenon, focussing upon the dysarthric speaker’s own output. The main aim of this thesis is to consider the interactive features of dysarthria, and to examine how such talk might be sequentially organised through everyday conversation. This thesis presents an analysis of naturally occurring conversation interaction between three adults with dysarthric speech and their family members. Utilising the principles and methods of Conversation Analysis (CA), the study provides an examination of the management of troubles in both dysarthric speech production and AAC system use. The analysis focuses on the nature of both ‘simple’ and ‘complex’ troubles, how they are revealed through the practice of other-initiated repair, and how they are finally resolved. Findings show that both unintelligible speech and AAC system outputs are jointly managed through other-initiated repair and collaborative turn constructions. It is also shown that troubles in talk can occur despite an achievement of intelligibility, and that the understandability of a turn’s action can be treated separately from its intelligibility. Examining the occurrence and resolution of troubles in talk between people with dysarthria and significant others, this thesis offers new insights and implications for clinical assessment, therapy and outcomes for people with acquired progressive dysarthria, family members, professionals and carers.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Trouble sources and repair in acquired dysarthria and communication aid use: A conversation analysis study
Keywords: dysarthria, conversation analysis, AAC
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/66888
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