UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort?

Kuh, D; Shah, I; Richards, M; Mishra, G; Wadsworth, M; Hardy, R; (2009) Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort? Social Science & Medicine , 68 (9) pp. 1565-1573. 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.006. Green open access

[thumbnail of Hardy-R_do childhood cognitive_premature adult mortality.pdf]
Preview
Text
Hardy-R_do childhood cognitive_premature adult mortality.pdf - Published Version

Download (240kB) | Preview

Abstract

Poor childhood and adult socio-economic conditions, lower childhood cognitive ability and cigarette smoking are all associated with adult mortality risk. Using data on 4458 men and women aged 60 years from a British birth cohort study, we investigated the extent to which these risk factors are part of the same pathway linking childhood experience to adult survival. Compared with women from non-manual origins, men from non-manual origins, women and men from manual origins, and those with missing data on father's social class had about double the risk of mortality between 26 and 60 years. Cox proportional hazards models showed that these differences were reduced but remained significant after adjusting for childhood cognitive ability, adult socio-economic conditions and smoking. Higher childhood ability increased survival chances by securing better adult socio-economic conditions, such as home ownership, which was strongly associated with survival. These findings were similar for cardiovascular and cancer mortality.

Type: Article
Title: Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort?
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.006
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.006
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Keywords: Adult, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, Female, Great Britain, Housing, Humans, Intelligence, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Longevity, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Neoplasms, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Smoking, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/55369
Downloads since deposit
89Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item