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Socioeconomic position and risk of short-term weight gain: Prospective study of 14,619 middle-aged men and women

Purslow, LR; Young, EH; Wareham, NJ; Forouhi, N; Brunner, EJ; Luben, RN; Welch, AA; ... Sandhu, MS; + view all (2008) Socioeconomic position and risk of short-term weight gain: Prospective study of 14,619 middle-aged men and women. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH , 8 , Article 112. 10.1186/1471-2458-8-112. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: The association between socioeconomic position in middle age and risk of subsequent, short-term weight gain is unknown. We therefore assessed this association in a prospective population based cohort study in Norfolk, UK.Methods: We analysed data on 14,619 middle-aged men and women (aged between 40-75 at baseline) with repeated objective measures of weight and height at baseline (1993-1997) and follow up (1998-2000).Results: During follow up 5,064 people gained more than 2.5 kg. Compared with the highest social class, individuals in the lowest social class had around a 30% greater risk of gaining more than 2.5 kg (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.11-1.51; p for trend = 0.002). This association remained statistically significant following adjustment for sex, age, baseline BMI, smoking, and follow up time (OR 1.25; CI 1.07-1.46; p for trend < 0.001). We also found no material difference between unadjusted models and those including all confounders and potential mediators.Conclusion: Individuals of low socioeconomic position are at greatest risk of gaining weight during middle age, which is not explained by classical correlates of socioeconomic position and risk factors for obesity.

Type: Article
Title: Socioeconomic position and risk of short-term weight gain: Prospective study of 14,619 middle-aged men and women
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-112
Publisher version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC23233...
Keywords: STRESS-INDUCED CORTISOL, INSULIN-RESISTANCE, SWEDISH WOMEN, EPIC-NORFOLK, OBESITY, HEALTH, ADULTS, FAT, DETERMINANTS, PREDICTORS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/5286
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