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Effects of high- and low-fat meals on the diurnal response of plasma lipid metabolite concentrations in healthy middle-aged volunteers

Frape, DL; Williams, NR; Scriven, AJ; Palmer, CR; OSullivan, K; Fletcher, RJ; (1997) Effects of high- and low-fat meals on the diurnal response of plasma lipid metabolite concentrations in healthy middle-aged volunteers. BRIT J NUTR , 77 (3) 375 - 390. 10.1079/BJN19970039. Green open access

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Abstract

Three experiments were conducted in healthy middle-aged volunteers (six males and six females in Expt 1, six males and two females in Expt 2 and twelve males in Expt 3) with a mean BMI of 27 kg/m(2) to determine whether there is a difference between morning and afternoon dietary fat clearance and utilization, and to determine in what way the fat and starch contents of the meal influence postprandial blood lipid metabolites over 4.5 h. Over 4 days in Expt 1 each subject received isoenergetic, high-carbohydrate (L, 5.5 g mixed fat/meal) and moderately high-fat (M, 33 g mixed fat/meal) breakfasts and lunches, in three combinations (LL, MM, LM), or they fasted at breakfast time and received a high fat lunch (MM) in a randomized and balanced arrangement. Each evening a standard meal was given. The following effects were significant (P < 0.05): plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) responses were greater following RI meals; plasma TAG concentrations were greater in the afternoon than in the morning, following two meats of the same composition, although the postprandial incremental response was less following lunch than following breakfast and peak responses were reached much earlier than after breakfast; a low-fat breakfast, or fasting at breakfast time, delayed the peak TAG response to a M lunch. The plasma concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and of free glycerol were higher in the afternoon following M meals at breakfast and lunch, especially in males. This response was reduced, by the L breakfast preceding the M lunch. Two M meals in succession lowered plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration. In Expt 2 each subject received a very low-fat (VL) breakfast, followed by a lunch of the same composition. Each of these meals was followed, 110 min from the start of eating, by an infusion of Intralipid 10 % emulsion at the rate of 1 ml/kg body weight over 60 s. Clearance rates of Intralipid were faster in the afternoon than in the morning (P = 0.024). In Expt 3 twelve subjects were randomly allocated to either treatment MM or LM meal patterns, as given in Expt 1. These were given daily for a period of 17 d, during which the change in fasting plasma TAG concentration was similar in both treatments. On days 1, 16 and 17 responses were measured to the M lunch and to a glucose tolerance test (GTT), conducted 2 h 17 min after lunch. The post-lunch responses confirmed those found in Expt 1; but immediately following the glucose dose there was an abrupt increase in plasma TAG that was greater in treatment LM than in treatment MM (P = 0.025), whereas plasma NEFA concentration decreased rapidly in both treatments at that time (P = 0.00066).

Type: Article
Title: Effects of high- and low-fat meals on the diurnal response of plasma lipid metabolite concentrations in healthy middle-aged volunteers
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1079/BJN19970039
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN19970039
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997
Keywords: dietary fat, dietary carbohydrate, triacylglycerols, non-esterified fatty acids, DEPENDENT DIABETES-MELLITUS, HIGH-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEINS, ISOLATED RAT HEPATOCYTES, POSTPRANDIAL LIPEMIA, ALIMENTARY LIPEMIA, GLUCOSE-INGESTION, INSULIN BINDING, CARBOHYDRATE, CHOLESTEROL, DIET
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/407484
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