UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Biochemical Screening for Nonadherence Is Associated With Blood Pressure Reduction and Improvement in Adherence

Gupta, P; Patel, P; Štrauch, B; Lai, FY; Akbarov, A; Gulsin, GS; Beech, A; ... Tomaszewski, M; + view all (2017) Biochemical Screening for Nonadherence Is Associated With Blood Pressure Reduction and Improvement in Adherence. Hypertension , 70 (5) pp. 1042-1048. 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09631. Green open access

[thumbnail of Horne_1042.full.pdf]
Preview
Text
Horne_1042.full.pdf - Published version

Download (470kB) | Preview

Abstract

We hypothesized that screening for nonadherence to antihypertensive treatment using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based biochemical analysis of urine/serum has therapeutic applications in nonadherent hypertensive patients. A retrospective analysis of hypertensive patients attending specialist tertiary care centers was conducted in 2 European countries (United Kingdom and Czech Republic). Nonadherence to antihypertensive treatment was diagnosed using biochemical analysis of urine (United Kingdom) or serum (Czech Republic). These results were subsequently discussed with each patient, and data on follow-up clinic blood pressure (BP) measurements were collected from clinical files. Of 238 UK patients who underwent biochemical urine analysis, 73 were nonadherent to antihypertensive treatment. Their initial urinary adherence ratio (the ratio of detected to prescribed antihypertensive medications) increased from 0.33 (0-0.67) to 1 (0.67-1) between the first and the last clinic appointments. The observed increase in the urinary adherence ratio in initially nonadherent UK patients was associated with the improved BP control; by the last clinic appointment, systolic and diastolic BPs were ≈19.5 and 7.5 mm Hg lower than at baseline (P=0.001 and 0.009, respectively). These findings were further corroborated in 93 nonadherent hypertensive patients from Czech Republic-their average systolic and diastolic BPs dropped by ≈32.6 and 17.4 mm Hg, respectively (P<0.001), on appointments after the biochemical analysis. Our data show that nonadherent hypertensive patients respond to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based biochemical analysis with improved adherence and significant BP drop. Such repeated biochemical analyses should be considered as a therapeutic approach in nonadherent hypertensive patients.

Type: Article
Title: Biochemical Screening for Nonadherence Is Associated With Blood Pressure Reduction and Improvement in Adherence
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09631
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09631
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 The Authors. Hypertension is published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Adherence, antihypertensive agents, blood pressure, chromatography, liquid, hypertension
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1571822
Downloads since deposit
78Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item