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Dyslexia in higher education - Existence and implications of the double deficit hypothesis

Gibson, BL; (2006) Dyslexia in higher education - Existence and implications of the double deficit hypothesis. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

The double deficit hypothesis of dyslexia proposes naming speed as a second independent core deficit in dyslexia alongside phonological awareness. This study aimed to explore the double deficit in 237 students in higher education. Three literacy skills were examined (reading, spelling and timed non-word reading) to determine the independence of phonological awareness and rapid naming, and to compare literacy abilities among subgroups of students with dyslexia. Four subgroups were compared: a phonological awareness deficit subgroup, a naming speed deficit subgroup, a double deficit subgroup (with both phonological awareness and naming speed deficits), and a subgroup of the remaining dyslexic students who could not be classified according to the study criteria used. Results indicated separable effects of each variable reading appeared more dependent on phonological awareness while timed non-word reading was more closely associated with rapid naming. However dyslexia deficit subgroup comparisons failed to validate naming speed as a diagnostic tool. Nevertheless, naming speed deficits retained their importance in identifying the most disadvantaged readers. It is therefore concluded that the interaction of phonological awareness and naming speed deficits hinders the literacy skills of individuals with a double deficit.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Dyslexia in higher education - Existence and implications of the double deficit hypothesis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1568282
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