UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

How do you lose a river?

Gardner, JW; (2016) How do you lose a river? LivingMaps Review , 1 , Article 27. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
27-284-1-PB.pdf - Published version

Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

In this paper I explore the concept of the 'lost river' and the implications this term has for our understanding of the history of changing urban environments. In taking a voyage down one of the London 2012 Olympic Park’s now-filled waterways, the Pudding Mill River, charting it and its surrounding area’s diverse history, I explore how rivers end up becoming ‘losable’. Drawing on diverse methodologies from archaeology and geography and with a particular emphasis on mapping, I argue that a literal and metaphorical exploration of such a rapidly changing environment reveals a multitude of buried narratives and fluid histories. This research suggests that the labeling of a river as ‘lost’ is not a politically neutral act and that, with its romantic connotations, the term may actually serve to legitimize insensitive and contentious changes to our environment.

Type: Article
Title: How do you lose a river?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://livingmaps.review/journal/index.php/LMR/art...
Language: English
Additional information: This is the published version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: lost rivers, archaeology, London 2012, Olympics, mega events
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1565418
Downloads since deposit
152Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item