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Effects of short-term hyperoxia on erythropoietin levels and microcirculation in critically Ill patients: a prospective observational pilot study

Donati, A; Damiani, E; Zuccari, S; Domizi, R; Scorcella, C; Girardis, M; Giulietti, A; ... Singer, M; + view all (2017) Effects of short-term hyperoxia on erythropoietin levels and microcirculation in critically Ill patients: a prospective observational pilot study. BMC Anesthesiology , 17 , Article 49. 10.1186/s12871-017-0342-2. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The normobaric oxygen paradox states that a short exposure to normobaric hyperoxia followed by rapid return to normoxia creates a condition of ‘relative hypoxia’ which stimulates erythropoietin (EPO) production. Alterations in glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be involved in this process. We tested the effects of short-term hyperoxia on EPO levels and the microcirculation in critically ill patients. METHODS: In this prospective, observational study, 20 hemodynamically stable, mechanically ventilated patients with inspired oxygen concentration (FiO2) ≤0.5 and PaO2/FiO2 ≥ 200 mmHg underwent a 2-hour exposure to hyperoxia (FiO2 1.0). A further 20 patients acted as controls. Serum EPO was measured at baseline, 24 h and 48 h. Serum glutathione (antioxidant) and ROS levels were assessed at baseline (t0), after 2 h of hyperoxia (t1) and 2 h after returning to their baseline FiO2 (t2). The microvascular response to hyperoxia was assessed using sublingual sidestream dark field videomicroscopy and thenar near-infrared spectroscopy with a vascular occlusion test. RESULTS: EPO increased within 48 h in patients exposed to hyperoxia from 16.1 [7.4–20.2] to 22.9 [14.1–37.2] IU/L (p = 0.022). Serum ROS transiently increased at t1, and glutathione increased at t2. Early reductions in microvascular density and perfusion were seen during hyperoxia (perfused small vessel density: 85% [95% confidence interval 79–90] of baseline). The response after 2 h of hyperoxia exposure was heterogeneous. Microvascular perfusion/density normalized upon returning to baseline FiO2. CONCLUSIONS: A two-hour exposure to hyperoxia in critically ill patients was associated with a slight increase in EPO levels within 48 h. Adequately controlled studies are needed to confirm the effect of short-term hyperoxia on erythropoiesis.

Type: Article
Title: Effects of short-term hyperoxia on erythropoietin levels and microcirculation in critically Ill patients: a prospective observational pilot study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12871-017-0342-2
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1186/s12871-017-0342-2
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s). 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Anesthesiology, Erythropoietin, Anemia, Normobaric hyperoxia, Microcirculation, NORMOBARIC OXYGEN PARADOX, CARE-UNIT PATIENTS, HEALTHY HUMANS, CARDIAC-OUTPUT, INCREASE, TRANSFUSION, HYPOXIA, SURGERY, SEPSIS, CELLS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1552804
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