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Spinal microcircuits comprising dI3 interneurons are necessary for motor functional recovery following spinal cord transection

Bui, TV; Stifani, N; Akay, T; Brownstone, RM; (2016) Spinal microcircuits comprising dI3 interneurons are necessary for motor functional recovery following spinal cord transection. eLIFE , 5 , Article e21715. 10.7554/eLife.21715. Green open access

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Abstract

The spinal cord has the capacity to coordinate motor activities such as locomotion. Following spinal transection, functional activity can be regained, to a degree, following motor training. To identify microcircuits involved in this recovery, we studied a population of mouse spinal interneurons known to receive direct afferent inputs and project to intermediate and ventral regions of the spinal cord. We demonstrate that while dI3 interneurons are not necessary for normal locomotor activity, locomotor circuits rhythmically inhibit them and dI3 interneurons can activate these circuits. Removing dI3 interneurons from spinal microcircuits by eliminating their synaptic transmission left locomotion more or less unchanged, but abolished functional recovery, indicating that dI3 interneurons are a necessary cellular substrate for motor system plasticity following transection. We suggest that dI3 interneurons compare inputs from locomotor circuits with sensory afferent inputs to compute sensory prediction errors that then modify locomotor circuits to effect motor recovery.

Type: Article
Title: Spinal microcircuits comprising dI3 interneurons are necessary for motor functional recovery following spinal cord transection
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.21715
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21715
Language: English
Additional information: © Bui et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Biology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics, Dependent Plasticity, Cutaneous Reflexes, Homeostatic Plasticity, Physiological-Basis, Fictive Locomotion, Sensory Prediction, Neonatal Mouse, In-Vitro, Injury, Neurons
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1535099
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