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Compressive loading of the murine tibia reveals site-specific micro-scale differences in adaptation and maturation rates of bone

Bergström, I; Kerns, JG; Törnqvist, AE; Perdikouri, C; Mathavan, N; Koskela, A; Henriksson, HB; ... Windahl, SH; + view all (2016) Compressive loading of the murine tibia reveals site-specific micro-scale differences in adaptation and maturation rates of bone. Osteoporosis International 10.1007/s00198-016-3846-6. Green open access

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Abstract

Loading increases bone mass and strength in a site-specific manner; however, possible effects of loading on bone matrix composition have not been evaluated. Site-specific structural and material properties of mouse bone were analyzed on the macro- and micro/molecular scale in the presence and absence of axial loading. The response of bone to load is heterogeneous, adapting at molecular, micro-, and macro-levels. INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a degenerative disease resulting in reduced bone mineral density, structure, and strength. The overall aim was to explore the hypothesis that changes in loading environment result in site-specific adaptations at molecular/micro- and macro-scale in mouse bone. METHODS: Right tibiae of adult mice were subjected to well-defined cyclic axial loading for 2 weeks; left tibiae were used as physiologically loaded controls. The bones were analyzed with μCT (structure), reference point indentation (material properties), Raman spectroscopy (chemical), and small-angle X-ray scattering (mineral crystallization and structure). RESULTS: The cranial and caudal sites of tibiae are structurally and biochemically different within control bones. In response to loading, cranial and caudal sites increase in cortical thickness with reduced mineralization (-14 and -3%, p < 0.01, respectively) and crystallinity (-1.4 and -0.3%, p < 0.05, respectively). Along the length of the loaded bones, collagen content becomes more heterogeneous on the caudal site and the mineral/collagen increases distally at both sites. CONCLUSION: Bone structure and composition are heterogeneous, finely tuned, adaptive, and site-specifically responsive at the micro-scale to maintain optimal function. Manipulation of this heterogeneity may affect bone strength, relative to specific applied loads.

Type: Article
Title: Compressive loading of the murine tibia reveals site-specific micro-scale differences in adaptation and maturation rates of bone
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00198-016-3846-6
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-016-3846-6
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Loading, RPI, Raman spectroscopy, SAXS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1531168
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