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How Much Do Job Satisfaction and Relationship Quality Predict Intention to Engage in Health Behaviours in Men and Women? A Pilot Study

Lemkey, L; Fletchder, C; Barry, JA; (2016) How Much Do Job Satisfaction and Relationship Quality Predict Intention to Engage in Health Behaviours in Men and Women? A Pilot Study. New Male Studies , 5 (1) pp. 31-47. Green open access

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Abstract

This study aimed to assess the degree to which problems with job satisfaction and relationship quality predict problem drinking and the intention to engage in healthy behaviours. This cross-sectional online survey was analysed using multiple linear regression. 312 men and women participated in the survey. The only significant predictor of problem drinking was neuroticism (emotionality), and this was significant for women only (β = 0.26, p <.05). The most significant predictor of intention to engage in healthy behaviours for women was feeling good about health behaviours (β = 0.36, p <.001), and for men it was greater satisfaction with the clarity of organisational communication (β = 0.42, p <.001). Some intriguing gender differences were found, for example, women who were dissatisfied with pay seemed to compensate by intending to engage more in health behaviours (β = 0.36, p <.05), whereas men who were dissatisfied with pay were less likely to intend to engage in health behaviours (β = -0.34, p <.01). These findings are of importance in understanding how workplace factors predict intention to engage in health behaviours in men and women. Further research should explore the reasons for these interesting gender differences.

Type: Article
Title: How Much Do Job Satisfaction and Relationship Quality Predict Intention to Engage in Health Behaviours in Men and Women? A Pilot Study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://newmalestudies.com/OJS/index.php/nms/articl...
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2015 Australian Institute of Male Health and Studies. This journal uses Open Journal Systems 2.3.4.0, which is open source journal management and publishing software developed, supported, and freely distributed by the public knowledge project under the GNU general public license.
Keywords: health behaviours, alcohol, job satisfaction, relationship, gender, Integrative Model of Behaviour Prediction (IMBP)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1505929
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