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Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering based on natural polymers of bacterial origin, thermoplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and micro-fibrillated bacterial cellulose

Akaraonye, E; Filip, J; Safarikova, M; Salih, V; Keshavarz, T; Knowles, JC; Roy, I; (2016) Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering based on natural polymers of bacterial origin, thermoplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and micro-fibrillated bacterial cellulose. Polymer International , 65 (7) pp. 780-791. 10.1002/pi.5103. Green open access

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Abstract

Cartilage tissue engineering is an emerging therapeutic strategy that aims to regenerate damaged cartilage caused by disease, trauma, ageing or developmental disorder. Since cartilage lacks regenerative capabilities, it is essential to develop approaches that deliver the appropriate cells, biomaterials and signalling factors to the defect site. Materials and fabrication technologies are therefore critically important for cartilage tissue engineering in designing temporary, artificial extracellular matrices (scaffolds), which support 3D cartilage formation. Hence, this work aimed to investigate the use of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/microfibrillated bacterial cellulose (P(3HB)/MFC) composites as 3D-scaffolds for potential application in cartilage tissue engineering. The compression moulding/particulate leaching technique employed in the study resulted in good dispersion and a strong adhesion between the MFC and the P(3HB) matrix. Furthermore, the composite scaffold produced displayed better mechanical properties than the neat P(3HB) scaffold. On addition of 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt% MFC to the P(3HB) matrix, the compressive modulus was found to have increased by 35%, 37%, 64% and 124%, while the compression yield strength increased by 95%, 97%, 98% and 102% respectively with respect to neat P(3HB). Both cell attachment and proliferation were found to be optimal on the polymer-based 3D composite scaffolds produced, indicating a non-toxic and highly compatible surface for the adhesion and proliferation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells. The large pores sizes (60 - 83 µm) in the 3D scaffold allowed infiltration and migration of ATDC5 cells deep into the porous network of the scaffold material. Overall this work confirmed the potential of P(3HB)/MFC composites as novel materials in cartilage tissue engineering.

Type: Article
Title: Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering based on natural polymers of bacterial origin, thermoplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and micro-fibrillated bacterial cellulose
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/pi.5103
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pi.5103
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [Akaraonye, E., Filip, J., Safarikova, M., Salih, V., Keshavarz, T., Knowles, J. C. and Roy, I. (2016), Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering based on natural polymers of bacterial origin, thermoplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and micro-fibrillated bacterial cellulose. Polym. Int., 65: 780–791. doi: 10.1002/pi.5103], which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pi.5103. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Keywords: polyhydroxyalkanoates; poly(3-hydroxybutyrate); bacterial cellulose; micro-fibrillated cellulose; tissue engineering scaffold; composite materials
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Biomaterials and Tissue Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1498410
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