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Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy

Ahmad, R; Royle, G; Lourenço, A; Schwarz, M; Fracchiolla, F; Ricketts, K; (2016) Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy. Physics in Medicine and Biology , 61 (12) pp. 4537-4550. 10.1088/0031-9155/61/12/4537. Green open access

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Abstract

High-Z nano materials have been previously shown to increase the amount of dose deposition within the tumour due to an increase in secondary electrons. This study evaluates the effects of high-Z nano materials in combination with protons, and the impact of proton energy, nanoparticle material and concentration. These effects were studied in silico through Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally through a phantom study, with particular attention to macroscale changes to the Bragg peak in the presence of nanoparticles. Three nanoparticle materials were simulated (gold, silver and platinum) at three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 6.5 mg ml(-1)) at two clinical proton energies (60 and 226 MeV). Simulations were verified experimentally using Gafchromic film measurements of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at two available high concentrations (5.5 mg ml(-1) and 1.1 mg ml(-1)). A significant change to Bragg peak features was evident, where at 226 MeV and 6.5 mg ml(-1), simulations of gold showed a 4.7 mm longitudinal shift of the distal edge and experimentally at 5.5 mg ml(-1), a shift of 2.2 mm. Simulations showed this effect to be material dependent, where platinum having the highest physical density caused the greatest shift with increasing concentration. A dose enhancement of 6%  ±  0.05 and 5%  ±  0.15 (60 MeV and 226 MeV, respectively) was evident with gold at 6.5 mg ml(-1) to water alone, compared to the 21%  ±  0.53 observed experimentally as dose to film with 5.5 mg ml(-1) of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at 226 MeV. The introduction of nanoparticles has strong potential to enhance dose in proton therapy, however the changes to the Bragg peak distribution that occur with high concentrations need to be accounted for to ensure tumour coverage.

Type: Article
Title: Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1088/0031-9155/61/12/4537
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/61/12/4537
Language: English
Additional information: © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence (CC BY 3.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1496206
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