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Teachers' use of questioning and modelling comprehension skills in primary classrooms

Parker, M; Hurry, J; (2007) Teachers' use of questioning and modelling comprehension skills in primary classrooms. Educational Review , 59 (3) pp. 299-314. 10.1080/00131910701427298. Green open access

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Abstract

Research suggests that children's understanding of text can be improved by the explicit teaching of those comprehension strategies that are used implicitly by skilled readers, particularly the use of self-regulating strategies to generate questions about text. This study of the teaching of comprehension in 51 London Key Stage 2 classrooms explores the extent to which comprehension strategies are explicitly taught within the literacy hour and the amount of opportunity which is provided for children to generate there own questions. Evidence from teacher interviews and classroom observations shows that direct teacher questioning, mostly in the form of 'teacher-led recitation', is both the most frequently advocated, and the dominant strategy used for teaching comprehension. When sharing books with children, teachers model the strategies which are used by skilled comprehenders, but they neither make these strategies explicit nor encourage children to generate their own questions about the text.

Type: Article
Title: Teachers' use of questioning and modelling comprehension skills in primary classrooms
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/00131910701427298
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1477918
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