UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Setting, Mechanical, Morphological, Degradation and Antibacterial Properties of Brushite cements

Xia, W; Ashley, P; Spratt, D; Young, A; (2015) Setting, Mechanical, Morphological, Degradation and Antibacterial Properties of Brushite cements. Presented at: International Association of Dental Research (IADR), Boston, MA, United States. Green open access

[thumbnail of WX IADR Boston Poster 2015 final.pdf]
Preview
Text
WX IADR Boston Poster 2015 final.pdf - Published Version

Download (552kB) | Preview

Abstract

Aims: This study aim was to develop high strength, antibacterial-releasing brushite cements with controllable setting and porosity for bone-filling. Materials and Methods: Monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) was reacted with equimolar β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and 800mM aqueous citric acid (CA) containing 0, 20, or 40wt% of antibacterial ε-polylysine (PLS). The large MCPM monoclinic crystals (10x100x500 micron) were used as received or after grinding. The powder to liquid ratio was 3:1 or 4:1. Setting kinetics, mechanical strengths, fracture surface morphologies, degradation rates, and PLS release was undertaken. Additionally, MRSA colony forming units (CFU) on set material discs with 0 versus 40wt% PLS and in surrounding broth medium was compared. Results Use of smaller particles and increased PLS lead to formation of more stable intermediate complexes and slower Brushite formation. Formulations with intermediate MCPM particle size and higher powder content had significantly higher flexural strengths. Pores / channels with dimensions comparable with those of the original MCPM crystals were detected on the fracture surfaces. Dissolution rates were affected by MCPM particle size but not PLS content. PLS release occurred primarily in the first 24 hours of set disc immersion in water. Addition of PLS enabled MRSA growth to decline from 1.8 x 107 to 2.5 x 104 on a set disc and from 2.0 x 109 to 1.2 x 104 CFU in the surrounding medium. . Conclusion and significance The above antibacterial Brushite cements could be employed in the treatment of infected bone (e.g. periodontitis, implantitis, osteomyelitis). Controlled setting is required to minimise leakage away from the required site of application. The channels in the cements and dissolution will allow bone cell penetration and provide ions for new bone formation respectively. The higher strengths will enable application in greater load bearing clinical situations.

Type: Poster
Title: Setting, Mechanical, Morphological, Degradation and Antibacterial Properties of Brushite cements
Event: International Association of Dental Research (IADR)
Location: Boston, MA, United States
Dates: 25 March 2015 - 28 March 2015
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://www.iadr.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=443...
Language: English
Keywords: cement, antibacterial
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Biomaterials and Tissue Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > EDI Craniofacial and Development Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Microbial Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1477523
Downloads since deposit
97Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item