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The 'active ingredients' for successful community engagement with disadvantaged expectant and new mothers: a qualitative comparative analysis

Brunton, G; O'Mara-Eves, A; Thomas, J; (2014) The 'active ingredients' for successful community engagement with disadvantaged expectant and new mothers: a qualitative comparative analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing , 70 (12) pp. 2847-2860. 10.1111/jan.12441. Green open access

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Abstract

AIMS: To explore which conditions of community engagement are implicated in effective interventions targeting disadvantaged pregnant women and new mothers. BACKGROUND: Adaptive experiences during pregnancy and the early years are key to reducing health inequalities in women and children worldwide. Public health nurses, health visitors and community midwives are well placed to address such disadvantage, often using community engagement strategies. Such interventions are complex; however, and we need to better understand which aspects of community engagement are aligned with effectiveness. DESIGN: Qualitative comparative analysis conducted in 2013, of trials data included in a recently published systematic review. METHODS: Two reviewers agreed on relevant conditions from 24 maternity or early years intervention studies examining four models of community engagement. Effect size estimates were converted into 'fuzzy' effectiveness categories and truth tables were constructed. Using fsQCA software, Boolean minimization identified solution sets. Random effects multiple regression and fsQCA were conducted to rule out risk of methodological bias. RESULTS/FINDINGS: Studies focused on antenatal, immunization, breastfeeding and early professional intervention outcomes. Peer delivery (consistency 0·83; unique coverage 0·63); and mother-professional collaboration (consistency 0·833; unique coverage 0·21) were moderately aligned with effective interventions. Community-identified health need plus consultation/collaboration in intervention design and leading on delivery were weakly aligned with 'not effective' interventions (consistency 0·78; unique coverage 0·29). CONCLUSIONS: For disadvantaged new and expectant mothers, peer or collaborative delivery models could be used in interventions. A need exists to design and test community engagement interventions in other areas of maternity and early years care and to further evaluate models of empowerment.

Type: Article
Title: The 'active ingredients' for successful community engagement with disadvantaged expectant and new mothers: a qualitative comparative analysis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/jan.12441
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.12441
Language: English
Additional information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Brunton, G; O'Mara-Eves, A; Thomas, J; (2014) The 'active ingredients' for successful community engagement with disadvantaged expectant and new mothers: a qualitative comparative analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 70 (12) pp. 2847-2860, which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.12441. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms).
Keywords: community, health visiting, maternity nursing, patient participation, public health nursing, qualitative approaches, Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Community Networks, Cooperative Behavior, Evaluation Studies as Topic, Female, Great Britain, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Ireland, Male, Maternal-Child Nursing, Middle Aged, Models, Psychological, Mothers, Patient Participation, Power (Psychology), Pregnancy, Pregnant Women, Public Health Nursing, Qualitative Research, Social Support, Stress, Psychological, United States, Vulnerable Populations, Young Adult
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1475664
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