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Impaired function of endothelial progenitor cells in children with primary systemic vasculitis

Hong, Y; Eleftheriou, D; Klein, NJ; Brogan, PA; (2015) Impaired function of endothelial progenitor cells in children with primary systemic vasculitis. Arthritis Research and Therapy , 17 , Article 292. 10.1186/s13075-015-0810-3. Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Previously, we demonstrated that children with active systemic vasculitis (SV) have higher circulating CD34 + CD133 + KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPC); the function of these EPCs, and their relationship with disease activity in vasculitis remains largely unexplored. We hypothesized that although EPC numbers are higher, EPC function is impaired in active SV of the young. The aims of this study were therefore to: 1. investigate the relationship between disease activity and EPC function in children with SV; and 2. study the influence of systemic inflammation on EPC function by investigating the effects of hyperthermia and TNF-α on EPC function. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of unselected children with SV with different levels of disease activity attending a single center (Great Ormond Street Hospital, London) between October 2008 and December 2014. EPCs were isolated from peripheral blood of children with SV, and healthy child controls. EPC function was assessed by their potential to form colonies (EPC-CFU), and ability to form clusters and incorporate into human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) vascular structures in matrigel. The effects of hyperthermia and TNF-α on EPC function were also studied. RESULTS: Twenty children, median age 12-years (5-16.5; nine males) were studied. EPC-CFU and the number of EPC clusters formed on matrigel were significantly reduced in children with active vasculitis compared with healthy controls (p = 0.02 for EPC-CFU; p = 0.01 for EPC cluster formation). Those with active vasculitis had lower EPC-CFU and EPC cluster formation than those with inactive disease, although non-significantly so. In addition, EPC incorporation into matrigel HUVEC networks was lower in children with SV compared with healthy children, irrespective of disease activity. Ex-vivo pre-treatment of EPC with hyperthermia impaired EPC function; TNF-α down-regulated EPC expression of CD18/CD11b and resulted in decreased incorporation into HUVEC networks. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst our previous work showed that circulating CD34 + EPC numbers are well preserved, this study revealed that EPC function is significantly impaired in children with vasculitis. It is possible that the chronic inflammatory milieu associated with vasculitis may impair EPC function, and thus contribute to an unfavourable balance between endothelial injury and repair. The mechanism of this remains to be established, however.

Type: Article
Title: Impaired function of endothelial progenitor cells in children with primary systemic vasculitis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13075-015-0810-3
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13075-015-0810-3
Language: English
Additional information: © 2015 Hong et al. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1473995
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