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Voluntary and involuntary emotional memory following an analogue traumatic stressor: the differential effects of communality in men and women

Kamboj, SK; Oldfield, L; Loewenberger, A; Das, RK; Bisby, J; Brewin, CR; (2014) Voluntary and involuntary emotional memory following an analogue traumatic stressor: the differential effects of communality in men and women. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry , 45 (4) pp. 421-426. 10.1016/j.jbtep.2014.05.001. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Men and women show differences in performance on emotional processing tasks. Sex also interacts with personality traits to affect information processing. Here we examine effects of sex, and two personality traits that are differentially expressed in men and women – instrumentality and communality – on voluntary and involuntary memory for distressing video-footage. / Methods: On session one, participants (n = 39 men; 40 women) completed the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, which assesses communal and instrumental traits. After viewing film-footage of death/serious injury, participants recorded daily involuntary memories (intrusions) relating to the footage on an online diary for seven days, returning on day eight for a second session to perform a voluntary memory task relating to the film. / Results: Communality interacted with sex such that men with higher levels of communality reported more frequent involuntary memories. Alternatively, a communality × sex interaction reflected a tendency for women with high levels of communality to perform more poorly on the voluntary recognition memory task. / Limitations: The study involved healthy volunteers with no history of significant psychological disorder. Future research with clinical populations will help to determine the generalizability of the current findings. / Conclusion: Communality has separate effects on voluntary and involuntary emotional memory. We suggest that high levels of communality in men and women may confer vulnerability to the negative effects of stressful events either through the over-encoding of sensory/perceptual-information in men or the reduced encoding of contextualised, verbally-based, voluntarily accessible representations in women.

Type: Article
Title: Voluntary and involuntary emotional memory following an analogue traumatic stressor: the differential effects of communality in men and women
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jbtep.2014.05.001
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2014.05.001
Language: English
Additional information: © 2014. This manuscript version is published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). This licence allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work for personal and non-commercial use providing author and publisher attribution is clearly stated. Further details about CC BY licences are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0.
Keywords: Communality, Emotional memory, Femininity, Gender, Intrusive memory, Involuntary memory, PTSD, Adolescent, Adult, Emotions, Female, Humans, Male, Memory, Neuropsychological Tests, Online Systems, Photic Stimulation, Sex Characteristics, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Stress, Psychological, Visual Perception, Young Adult
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1433498
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