UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

No evidence of a longitudinal association between diurnal cortisol patterns and cognition.

Singh-Manoux, A; Dugravot, A; Elbaz, A; Shipley, M; Kivimaki, M; Kumari, M; (2014) No evidence of a longitudinal association between diurnal cortisol patterns and cognition. Neurobiol Aging , 35 (10) pp. 2239-2245. 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.03.015. Green open access

[thumbnail of 1-s2.0-S0197458014002693-main.pdf]
Preview
PDF
1-s2.0-S0197458014002693-main.pdf

Download (286kB)

Abstract

We examined the effect of salivary cortisol on cognitive performance and decline in 3229 adults (79% men), mean age 61 years. Six saliva samples over the day along with a cognition test battery were administered twice in 5 years. In fully-adjusted cross-sectional analyses from 2002 to 2004, higher waking cortisol was associated with higher reasoning score (β = 0.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.15) but this finding was not replicated using data from 2007 to 2009. Over the mean 5 years follow-up there was decline in all cognitive tests but this decline did not vary as a function of cortisol levels; the exception was among APOE e4 carriers where a flatter diurnal slope and higher bedtime cortisol were associated with faster decline in verbal fluency. Changes in cortisol measures between 2002/2004 and 2007/2009 or chronically elevated levels were not associated with cognitive performance in 2007/2009. These results, based on a large sample of community-dwelling adults suggest that variability in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function is not a strong contributor to cognitive aging.

Type: Article
Title: No evidence of a longitudinal association between diurnal cortisol patterns and cognition.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.03.015
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.03...
Additional information: �© 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
Keywords: Cognitive decline, Cortisol, Glucocorticoid
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1427336
Downloads since deposit
107Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item