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Job strain and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: an individual-participant meta-analysis.

Heikkilä, K; Madsen, IE; Nyberg, ST; Fransson, EI; Ahola, K; Alfredsson, L; Bjorner, JB; ... for the IPD-Work Consortium; + view all (2014) Job strain and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: an individual-participant meta-analysis. Eur Respir J , 44 (1) pp. 247-251. 10.1183/09031936.00205113. Green open access

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Abstract

To the Editor:Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide (1). The clinical course of COPD is characterised by exacerbations, which can be minor and manageable at home or in primary care, or severe, leading to hospitalisation or even death. Known causes of exacerbations include tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts and fumes, and respiratory infections (1, 2). One less well understood risk factor is stress, which could plausibly lead to COPD exacerbations as it can trigger inflammation (3, 4) and is associated with increased smoking (5), which are both implicated in COPD pathology (2). Work is an important source of stress in the age groups in which COPD is typically diagnosed (1, 6). However, we are not aware of previous investigations of work-related stress and the risk of COPD exacerbations.In this study, we examined the associations between job strain (the most widely studied conceptualisation of work-related stress) and severe COPD exacerbations using individual-level data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the Individual Participant Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium (7). Job strain is defined as a combination of high demands (excessive amounts of work) and low control (having little influence on what tasks to.

Type: Article
Title: Job strain and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: an individual-participant meta-analysis.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1183/09031936.00205113
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00205113
Additional information: �© ERS 2014. ERJ Open articles are open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Licence 3.0.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1426335
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