UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Delusional belief flexibility and informal caregiving relationships in psychosis: a potential cognitive route for the protective effect of social support

Jolley, S; Ferner, H; Bebbington, P; Garety, P; Dunn, G; Freeman, D; Fowler, D; (2013) Delusional belief flexibility and informal caregiving relationships in psychosis: a potential cognitive route for the protective effect of social support. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences , 23 (4) pp. 389-397. 10.1017/S2045796013000553. Green open access

[thumbnail of Bebbington_Jolley et al Delusional Belief Flexibility and Caregiving in Psychosis_.pdf]
Preview
Text
Bebbington_Jolley et al Delusional Belief Flexibility and Caregiving in Psychosis_.pdf - Accepted version

Download (569kB) | Preview

Abstract

For people with psychosis, contact with informal caregivers is an important source of social support, associated with recovery, and with better outcomes following individual cognitive therapy (CBTp). In this study, we tested whether increased flexibility in delusional thinking, an established predictor of positive outcome following CBTp, was a possible mechanism underlying this effect. 219 participants with delusions (mean age 38 years; 71% male; 75% White) were grouped according to the presence of a caregiver (37% with a caregiver) and caregiver level of expressed emotion (High/Low EE, 64% Low). Delusional belief flexibility was compared between groups, controlling for interpersonal functioning, severity of psychotic symptoms, and other hypothesised outcome predictors. Participants with caregivers were nearly three times more likely than those without to show flexibility (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.5 to 5.0, p = 0.001), and five times more likely if the caregiving relationship was Low EE (OR = 5.0, 95% CI 2.0–13.0, p = 0.001). ORs remained consistent irrespective of controlling for interpersonal functioning and other predictors of outcome. This is the first evidence that having supportive caregiving relationships is associated with a specific cognitive attribute in people with psychosis, suggesting a potential cognitive mechanism by which outcomes following CBTp, and perhaps more generally, are improved by social support.

Type: Article
Title: Delusional belief flexibility and informal caregiving relationships in psychosis: a potential cognitive route for the protective effect of social support
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S2045796013000553
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S2045796013000553
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Psychiatry, Caregivers, delusions, psychotic disorders, reasoning, schizophrenia, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, REASONING BIASES, FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES, BEHAVIORAL THERAPY, FAMILY ENVIRONMENT, EPISODE PSYCHOSIS, SYMPTOMS, RISK, SCHIZOPHRENIA, INTERVENTION
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > IoN RLW Inst of Neurological Sci
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1414098
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item