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Adverse effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy in sleep apnoea syndrome

Kalan, A; Kenyon, GS; Seemungal, TA; Wedzicha, JA; (1999) Adverse effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy in sleep apnoea syndrome. Journal of Laryngology and Otology , 113 (10) 888 - 892. 10.1017/S0022215100145517. Green open access

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Abstract

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is now the treatment of choice for patients with sleep apnoea syndrome. Side-effects and adverse reactions have been described in isolated reports with this device. We have, therefore, systematically studied the side-effects of nCPAP therapy in 300 consecutive patients referred to the London Chest Hospital Ventilatory Support Unit. Ninety-six per cent of patients complained of at least one side-effect resulting from the therapy, with 45 per cent complaining of a side-effect specific to the nasal mask. There was no correlation between the side-effects and level of pressure used during nCPAP. The rate of compliance remained high in spite of the side-effects, with a daily use of 7.8 hours (SD 8.05) and with 83 per cent of the patients using the device every night. Although nCPAP treatment remains acceptable to most patients there exists a high incidence of adverse effects.

Type: Article
Title: Adverse effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy in sleep apnoea syndrome
Location: ENGLAND
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0022215100145517
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022215100145517
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright Cambridge University Press 1999
Keywords: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Nasal Mucosa, Nasal Obstruction, Patient Compliance, Patient Satisfaction, Positive-Pressure Respiration, Silicone Elastomers, Sleep Apnea Syndromes, Sneezing, Xerostomia
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1359566
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