UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

An evidence informed approach to developing an adaptable regeneration programme for declining informal settlements

Karimi, K; Parham, E; (2012) An evidence informed approach to developing an adaptable regeneration programme for declining informal settlements. In: Greene, M and Reyes, J and Castro, A, (eds.) Proceedings: Eighth International Space Syntax Symposium. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile: Santiago de Chile, Chile. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Karimi_KKarimi_EParham_unplanned settlements_SSS8_01 2012.pdf

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper introduces a new approach to creating a regeneration framework for deteriorating unplanned settlements, or areas that often are regarded as ‘slums’. These areas are often in an irreversible cycle of deterioration, or ‘a vicious circle of decline’, which pushes the areas to worsen all the time. The main argument of this paper is how this process of decline could be stopped and reversed to create a positive cycle of change, or a ‘virtuous circle of improvement’. The guiding idea behind this transformation is that by understanding how a settlement grows, evolves and functions, we can identify an urban structure which shapes the internal functionality and external interactions of the settlement. This structure, which is strongly associated with movement, use, density, social interaction and other urban attributes, often suffers from multiple failures, which pushes the area into a descending cycle of decline. Fixing these fundamental problems will reverse the process of change, but it is a huge task and needs great resources that could not be provided in the beginning of the regeneration process. The paper argues that a highly adaptable regeneration programme, based on the most fundamental concepts of growth, could provide the basis for an incremental and sustainable process of regeneration for declining informal settlements. This entire methodology has been built on extensive research into the regeneration of the informal settlements of the city of Jeddah, in Saudi Arabia. By developing a series of analysis based on space syntax methods (Hillier & Hanson, 1989; Hillier, 1996), the essential spatial structures of the areas are established. A design process attempts to resolve the fundamental problems of these areas by improving the internal and external spatial structures. This is followed by an evidence‐informed distribution of land uses, densities, facilities and urban centres. In order to create flexibility and adaptability, a number of interchangeable regeneration scenarios are created that offer a range of variable solutions. A total redevelopment scenario, which is sometimes desired by some authorities, is complemented by at least four other scenarios, which seek different levels of intervention and physical change. The last of these scenarios is an improvement plan to only introduce the most efficient way of distributing and prioritising the regeneration efforts and external funding to optimise/enhance the living conditions and urban performance of the area. The product of this approach is not only a versatile and flexible plan for authorities, but it is intended to become a guide for residents, NGOs, charities, and everybody else, who is concerned with the well‐being of the people who live or work in declining informal settlements.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: An evidence informed approach to developing an adaptable regeneration programme for declining informal settlements
Event: 8th International Space Syntax Symposium
ISBN-13: 9789563458626
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://www.sss8.cl/media/upload/paginas/seccion/81...
Language: English
Additional information: Deposited with the permission of the publisher.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment > The Bartlett School of Architecture
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1359082
Downloads since deposit
458Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item