UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Dopamine, affordance and active inference.

Friston, KJ; Shiner, T; FitzGerald, T; Galea, JM; Adams, R; Brown, H; Dolan, RJ; ... Bestmann, S; + view all (2012) Dopamine, affordance and active inference. PLoS Comput Biol , 8 (1) , Article e1002327. 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002327. Green open access

[thumbnail of 1335595.pdf]
Preview
PDF
1335595.pdf

Download (1MB)

Abstract

The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level.

Type: Article
Title: Dopamine, affordance and active inference.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002327
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002327
Language: English
Additional information: © 2012 Friston et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: This work was funded by the Wellcome Trust, and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the European Research Council (ERC). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Keywords: Brain, Computer Simulation, Cues, Decision Making, Dopamine, Humans, Models, Neurological, Nerve Net, Perceptual Masking, Synaptic Transmission
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1335595
Downloads since deposit
128Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item