UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Genetic and Environmental Influences on Infant Growth: Prospective Analysis of the Gemini Twin Birth Cohort

Johnson, L; Llewellyn, CH; van Jaarsveld, CHM; Cole, TJ; Wardle, J; (2011) Genetic and Environmental Influences on Infant Growth: Prospective Analysis of the Gemini Twin Birth Cohort. PLOS ONE , 6 (5) , Article e19918. 10.1371/journal.pone.0019918. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
1309572.pdf

Download (166kB)

Abstract

Objective: Infancy is a critical period during which rapid growth potentially programs future disease risk. Identifying the modifiable determinants of growth is therefore important. To capture the complexity of infant growth, we modeled growth trajectories from birth to six months in order to compare the genetic and environmental influences on growth trajectory parameters with single time-point measures at birth, three and six months of age.Methods: Data were from Gemini, a population sample of 2402 UK families with twins. An average 10 weight measurements per child made by health professionals were available over the first six months. Weights at birth, three and six months were identified. Longitudinal growth trajectories were modeled using SITAR utilizing all available weight measures for each child. SITAR generates three parameters: size (characterizing mean weight throughout infancy), tempo (indicating age at peak weight velocity (PWV)), and velocity (reflecting the size of PWV). Genetic and environmental influences were estimated using quantitative genetic analysis.Results: In line with previous studies, heritability of weight at birth and three months was low (38%), but it was higher at six months (62%). Heritability of the growth trajectory parameters was high for size (69%) and velocity (57%), but low (35%) for tempo. Common environmental influences predominated for tempo (42%).Conclusion: Modeled growth parameters using SITAR indicated that size and velocity were primarily under genetic influence but tempo was predominantly environmentally determined. These results emphasize the importance of identifying specific modifiable environmental determinants of the timing of peak infant growth.

Type: Article
Title: Genetic and Environmental Influences on Infant Growth: Prospective Analysis of the Gemini Twin Birth Cohort
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0019918
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0019918
Language: English
Additional information: © 2011 Johnson et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Gemini is funded by a grant to JW from Cancer Research UK (C1418/A7974). TJC is funded by a grant from the Medical Research Council (G0700961). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Keywords: BODY-MASS-INDEX, HEAD CIRCUMFERENCE, EARLY-CHILDHOOD, HEIGHT GROWTH, WEIGHT, AGE, MENARCHE, OBESITY, MODEL, HERITABILITY
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1309572
Downloads since deposit
201Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item