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Existing motor state is favored at the expense of new movement during 13-35 Hz oscillatory synchrony in the human corticospinal system

Gilbertson, T; Lalo, E; Doyle, L; Di, L; V, C; B, B; P, .; (2005) Existing motor state is favored at the expense of new movement during 13-35 Hz oscillatory synchrony in the human corticospinal system. Journal of Neuroscience , 25 (34) 7771 - 7779. 10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.1762-05.2005. Green open access

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Abstract

Oscillations in local field potentials in the β-frequency band (13-35 Hz) are a pervasive feature of human and nonhuman primate motor cortical areas. However, the function of such synchronous activity across populations of neurons remains unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that β activity may promote existing motor set and posture while compromising processing related to new movements. Three experiments were performed. First, healthy subjects were instructed to make reaction time movements of the outstretched index finger in response to imperative cues triggered by transient increases in corticospinal synchrony, as evidenced by phasic elevations of β-frequency band microtremor and intermuscular synchrony. Second, healthy subjects were instructed to resist a stretch to the index finger triggered in the same way. Finger acceleration in the reaction time task and transcortical components of the stretch reflex were measured and compared with those elicited by random cue or stretch presentation. Finally, we sought a correlation between finger acceleration in the reaction time task and cortical synchrony directly measured from the electrocorticogram in two patients undergoing functional neurosurgery. We demonstrate that movements are slowed and transcortical responses to stretch are potentiated during periods of elevated β-band cortical synchrony. The results suggest that physiological periods of β synchrony are associated with a cortical state in which postural set is reinforced, but the speed of new movements impaired. The findings are of relevance to Parkinson's disease, in which subcortical and cortical β-band synchronization is exaggerated in the setting of increased tone and slowed movements.

Type: Article
Title: Existing motor state is favored at the expense of new movement during 13-35 Hz oscillatory synchrony in the human corticospinal system
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.1762-05.2005
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.1762-05.2005
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
Keywords: 2005/06, article, checked, Dept-Sobell, Div-Neurology, MyOPIA-toadd, PubMed, September, ucl2005
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > UCL Interaction Centre
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/102094
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