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Relationship of device measured physical activity type and posture with cardiometabolic health markers: pooled dose–response associations from the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep Consortium

Ahmadi, MN; Blodgett, JM; Atkin, AJ; Chan, HW; del Pozo Cruz, B; Suorsa, K; Bakker, EA; ... Stamatakis, E; + view all (2024) Relationship of device measured physical activity type and posture with cardiometabolic health markers: pooled dose–response associations from the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep Consortium. Diabetologia 10.1007/s00125-024-06090-y. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to examine the dose–response associations of device-measured physical activity types and postures (sitting and standing time) with cardiometabolic health. METHODS: We conducted an individual participant harmonised meta-analysis of 12,095 adults (mean ± SD age 54.5±9.6 years; female participants 54.8%) from six cohorts with thigh-worn accelerometry data from the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep (ProPASS) Consortium. Associations of daily walking, stair climbing, running, standing and sitting time with a composite cardiometabolic health score (based on standardised z scores) and individual cardiometabolic markers (BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, HbA1c and total cholesterol) were examined cross-sectionally using generalised linear modelling and cubic splines. RESULTS: We observed more favourable composite cardiometabolic health (i.e. z score <0) with approximately 64 min/day walking (z score [95% CI] −0.14 [−0.25, −0.02]) and 5 min/day stair climbing (−0.14 [−0.24, −0.03]). We observed an equivalent magnitude of association at 2.6 h/day standing. Any amount of running was associated with better composite cardiometabolic health. We did not observe an upper limit to the magnitude of the dose–response associations for any activity type or standing. There was an inverse dose–response association between sitting time and composite cardiometabolic health that became markedly less favourable when daily durations exceeded 12.1 h/day. Associations for sitting time were no longer significant after excluding participants with prevalent CVD or medication use. The dose–response pattern was generally consistent between activity and posture types and individual cardiometabolic health markers. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In this first activity type-specific analysis of device-based physical activity, ~64 min/day of walking and ~5.0 min/day of stair climbing were associated with a favourable cardiometabolic risk profile. The deleterious associations of sitting time were fully attenuated after exclusion of participants with prevalent CVD and medication use. Our findings on cardiometabolic health and durations of different activities of daily living and posture may guide future interventions involving lifestyle modification.

Type: Article
Title: Relationship of device measured physical activity type and posture with cardiometabolic health markers: pooled dose–response associations from the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep Consortium
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00125-024-06090-y
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-024-06090-y
Language: English
Additional information: © 2024 Springer Nature. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Cardiometabolic health, Individual participant meta-analysis, Physical activity type, Posture, Running, Sitting, Stair climbing, Standing, Walking, Wearables
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10189939
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