UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Trends in daily cigarette consumption among smokers: a population study in England, 2008-2023

Jackson, Sarah; Tattan-Birch, Harry; Buss, Vera; Shahab, Lion; Brown, James; (2024) Trends in daily cigarette consumption among smokers: a population study in England, 2008-2023. Nicotine and Tobacco Research , Article ntae071. 10.1093/ntr/ntae071. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of ntae071.pdf]
Preview
Text
ntae071.pdf

Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to estimate time trends in cigarette consumption among smokers in England between 2008 and 2023 and to explore differences by key potential moderators. Aims and Methods: We used data from 57 778 adult cigarette smokers participating in a nationally representative monthly cross-sectional survey between January 2008 and September 2023. We estimated monthly time trends in mean daily consumption of (1) any, (2) manufactured, and (3) hand-rolled cigarettes among all smokers and by main type of cigarettes smoked, smoking frequency, age, gender, occupational social grade, region, nicotine replacement therapy use, and vaping status. Results: Overall cigarette consumption fell from 13.6 [95% CI = 13.3 to 13.9] to 10.6 [10.5 to 10.8] per day between January 2008 and October 2019 (a 22% decrease), then remained stable up to September 2023. Over this period, the proportion mainly or exclusively smoking hand-rolled cigarettes increased (from 30.6% [29.1%–32.1%] in 2008 to 52.1% [49.7%–54.5%] in 2023). As a result, manufactured cigarette consumption fell by 47%, from 9.5 [9.2–9.8] per day in January 2008 to 5.0 [4.7–5.3] in September 2023, while hand-rolled cigarette consumption increased by 35%, from 4.2 [3.9–4.4] to 5.6 [5.3–5.9], respectively. The decline in overall cigarette consumption was observed across all subgroups, but was greater among non-daily smokers, younger smokers, and those who vaped. Conclusions: Over the last 15 years, the average number of cigarettes consumed each day by smokers in England has fallen by almost a quarter, but has plateaued since October 2019. There has been a sharp decline in the number of manufactured cigarettes consumed and an increase in the number of hand-rolled cigarettes consumed, as smokers have increasingly shifted towards using hand-rolled tobacco. Implications: While average cigarette consumption in England has fallen over the past 15 years, this declining trend has stalled (and reversed in some population groups) since 2019. The availability of cheap, hand-rolled tobacco appears to be undermining policies that aim to reduce smoking by raising the price of tobacco (eg, through taxation) and could be targeted to reignite the decline in cigarette consumption.

Type: Article
Title: Trends in daily cigarette consumption among smokers: a population study in England, 2008-2023
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntae071
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntae071
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2024. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10189776
Downloads since deposit
5Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item