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Diagnostic Biopsy for Small Renal Tumours: A Survey of Current European Practice

Warren, Hannah; Rautio, Aleksandra; Marandino, Laura; Pyrgidis, Nikolaos; Tzelves, Lazaros; Roussel, Eduard; Muselaers, Stijn; ... Tran, Maxine GB; + view all (2024) Diagnostic Biopsy for Small Renal Tumours: A Survey of Current European Practice. European Urology Open Science , 62 pp. 54-60. 10.1016/j.euros.2024.02.002. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background and objective: Renal tumour biopsy (RTB) can help in risk stratification of renal tumours with implications for management, but its utilisation varies. Our objective was to report current practice patterns, experiences, and perceptions of RTB and research gaps regarding RTB for small renal masses (SRMs). Methods: Two web-based surveys, one for health care providers (HCPs) and one for patients, were distributed via the European Association of Urology Young Academic Urologist Renal Cancer Working Group and the European Society of Residents in Urology in January 2023. Key findings and limitations: The HCP survey received 210 responses (response rate 51%) and the patient survey 54 responses (response rate 59%). A minority of HCPs offer RTB to >50% of patients (14%), while 48% offer it in <10% of cases. Most HCPs reported that RTB influences (61.5%) or sometimes influences (37.1%) management decisions. Patients were more likely to favour active treatment if RTB showed highgrade cancer and less likely to favour active treatment for benign histology. HCPs identified situations in which they would not favour RTB, such as cystic tumours and challenging anatomic locations. RTB availability (67%) and concerns about delays to treatment (43%) were barriers to offering RTB. Priority research gaps include a trial demonstrating that RTB leads to better clinical outcomes, and better evidence that benign/indolent tumours do not require active treatment. Conclusions and clinical implications: Utilisation of RTB for SRMs in Europe is low, even though both HCPs and patients reported that RTB results can affect disease management. Improving timely access to RTB and generating evidence on outcomes associated with RTB use are priorities for the kidney cancer community. Patient summary: A biopsy of a kidney mass can help patients and doctors make decisions on treatment, but our survey found that many patients in Europe are not offered this option. Better access to biopsy services is needed, as well as more research on what happens to patients after biopsy.

Type: Article
Title: Diagnostic Biopsy for Small Renal Tumours: A Survey of Current European Practice
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.euros.2024.02.002
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.euros.2024.02.002
Language: English
Additional information: © 2024 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Association of Urology. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Keywords: Biopsy, Kidney cancer, Small renal mass
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10189534
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