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Using the 5-Item Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) to Screen for Non-adherence to Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation After Bariatric Surgery

Spetz, Kristina; Olbers, Torsten; Östbring, Malin; Moon, Zoe; Horne, Rob; Andersson, Ellen; (2024) Using the 5-Item Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) to Screen for Non-adherence to Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation After Bariatric Surgery. Obesity Surgery 10.1007/s11695-023-07027-x. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Poor adherence to recommended vitamin and mineral supplementation after bariatric surgery is common and challenging for healthcare professionals to identify. There are several questionnaires for self-reporting of adherence to chronic medication, but none has so far been evaluated for assessment of adherence to vitamin and mineral supplementation after bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of the 5-item Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) in measuring adherence to vitamin and mineral supplementation post bariatric surgery (gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy). METHOD: The psychometric properties of MARS-5 for vitamin and mineral supplementation were validated in two cohorts: one at 1 year post bariatric surgery (n = 120) and the other at 2 years post-surgery (n = 211). MARS-5 was compared to pharmacy refill data for vitamin B12 and combined calcium/vitamin D as reference. RESULTS: Correlation analyses demonstrated that the MARS-5 had acceptable validity compared to objectively measured adherence rates from pharmacy refill data (calculated as continuous, multiple-interval measures of medication availability/gaps-coefficient ranged from 0.49 to 0.54). Internal reliability (Cronbach's α) was high: 0.81 and 0.95, respectively. There was a clear ceiling effect where one out of three had a maximum score on MARS-5. CONCLUSION: MARS-5 demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties for assessment of adherence to vitamin and mineral supplementation post bariatric surgery.

Type: Article
Title: Using the 5-Item Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) to Screen for Non-adherence to Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation After Bariatric Surgery
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s11695-023-07027-x
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-023-07027-x
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Adherence, Bariatric surgery, Compliance, Deficiencies, Gastric bypass, Mineral, Obesity, Sleeve gastrectomy, Vitamin
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10185349
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