UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Race as a Ghost Variable in (White) Opioid Research

Hansen, H; Parker, C; Netherland, J; (2020) Race as a Ghost Variable in (White) Opioid Research. Science Technology and Human Values , 45 (5) pp. 848-876. 10.1177/0162243920912812. Green open access

[thumbnail of Parker_Hansen Netherland Race as Ghost Variable STHV 6 27 19.pdf]
Preview
Text
Parker_Hansen Netherland Race as Ghost Variable STHV 6 27 19.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (762kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper traces the unspoken, implicit white racial logic of the brain disease model of addiction, which is based on seemingly universal, disembodied brains devoid of social or environmental influences. In the United States, this implicit white logic led to “context-free” neuroscience that made the social hierarchies of addiction and its consequences invisible to, and thus exacerbated by, national policies on opioids. The brain disease model of addiction was selectively deployed among the white middle-class population that had long accessed narcotics and pharmaceutical treatments for narcotics disorders from biomedical clinics, as opposed to from illegal sources subject to law enforcement. In turn, new treatments for opioid addiction were racially marketed to the same white clientele to which newly patented opioid analgesics were marketed, tapping into a circumscribed but highly lucrative consumer base that has long benefited from a legally protected, racially segregated safe space for white narcotics consumption. The connecting thread for the contemporary white opioid “crisis,” therefore, is white race as a ghost variable in addiction neuroscience and in its pharmaceutical and biotechnological translation.

Type: Article
Title: Race as a Ghost Variable in (White) Opioid Research
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/0162243920912812
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/0162243920912812
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Anthropology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10181927
Downloads since deposit
40Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item