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Impact of Social Vulnerability on Diabetes-Related Cardiovascular Mortality in the United States

Bashar, Hussein; Kobo, Ofer; Khunti, Kamlesh; Banerjee, Amitava; Bullock-Palmer, Renee P; Curzen, Nick; Mamas, Mamas A; (2023) Impact of Social Vulnerability on Diabetes-Related Cardiovascular Mortality in the United States. Journal of the American Heart Association , 12 , Article e029649. 10.1161/JAHA.123.029649. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Social vulnerability impacts the natural history of diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there are little data regarding the social vulnerability association with diabetes-related CVD mortality. Methods and Results County-level mortality data (where CVD was the underlying cause of death with diabetes among the multiple causes) extracted from the Centers for Disease Control multiple cause of death (2015-2019) and the 2018 Social Vulnerability Index databases were aggregated into quartiles based on their Social Vulnerability Index ranking from the least (first quartile) to the most vulnerable (fourth quartile). Stratified by demographic groups, the data were analyzed for overall CVD, as well as for ischemic heart disease, hypertensive disease, heart failure, and cerebrovascular disease. In the 5-year study period, 387 139 crude diabetes-related cardiovascular mortality records were identified. The age-adjusted mortality rate for CVD was higher in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (relative risk [RR], 1.66 [95% CI, 1.64-1.67]) with an estimated 39 328 excess deaths. Among the youngest age group (<55 years), those with the highest social vulnerability had 2 to 4 times the rate of cardiovascular mortality compared with the first quartile: ischemic heart disease (RR, 2.07 [95% CI, 1.97-2.17]; heart failure (RR, 3.03 [95% CI, 2.62-3.52]); hypertensive disease (RR, 3.79 [95% CI, 3.45-4.17]; and cerebrovascular disease (RR, 4.39 [95% CI, 3.75-5.13]). Conclusions Counties with greater social vulnerability had higher diabetes-related CVD mortality, especially among younger adults. Targeted health policies that are designed to reduce these disparities are warranted.

Type: Article
Title: Impact of Social Vulnerability on Diabetes-Related Cardiovascular Mortality in the United States
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.123.029649
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.123.029649
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
Keywords: Cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, social determinants of health, social vulnerability
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10179802
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