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Persistent symptoms after COVID-19 are not associated with differential SARS-CoV-2 antibody or T cell immunity

Altmann, Daniel M; Reynolds, Catherine J; Joy, George; Otter, Ashley D; Gibbons, Joseph M; Pade, Corinna; Swadling, Leo; ... Boyton, Rosemary J; + view all (2023) Persistent symptoms after COVID-19 are not associated with differential SARS-CoV-2 antibody or T cell immunity. Nature Communications , 14 (1) , Article 5139. 10.1038/s41467-023-40460-1. Green open access

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Abstract

Among the unknowns in decoding the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 persistent symptoms in Long Covid is whether there is a contributory role of abnormal immunity during acute infection. It has been proposed that Long Covid is a consequence of either an excessive or inadequate initial immune response. Here, we analyze SARS-CoV-2 humoral and cellular immunity in 86 healthcare workers with laboratory confirmed mild or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first wave. Symptom questionnaires allow stratification into those with persistent symptoms and those without for comparison. During the period up to 18-weeks post-infection, we observe no difference in antibody responses to spike RBD or nucleoprotein, virus neutralization, or T cell responses. Also, there is no difference in the profile of antibody waning. Analysis at 1-year, after two vaccine doses, comparing those with persistent symptoms to those without, again shows similar SARS-CoV-2 immunity. Thus, quantitative differences in these measured parameters of SARS-CoV-2 adaptive immunity following mild or asymptomatic acute infection are unlikely to have contributed to Long Covid causality. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04318314).

Type: Article
Title: Persistent symptoms after COVID-19 are not associated with differential SARS-CoV-2 antibody or T cell immunity
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-023-40460-1
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-023-40460-1
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Humans, Antibodies, Viral, Asymptomatic Infections, COVID-19, Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome, SARS-CoV-2, T-Lymphocytes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Clinical Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10175993
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