UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Current landscape of academic neurosurgical training in the United Kingdom: analysis by the Society of British Neurological Surgeons

Lee, Keng Siang S; Gillespie, Conor; Chari, Aswin; Momin, Sheikh; Turner, Carole D; Jenkinson, Michael; Brownstone, Robert; (2023) Current landscape of academic neurosurgical training in the United Kingdom: analysis by the Society of British Neurological Surgeons. British Journal of Neurosurgery 10.1080/02688697.2023.2213329. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Current landscape of academic neurosurgical training in the UK.pdf]
Preview
Text
Current landscape of academic neurosurgical training in the UK.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: Little is known about the impact of academic training on Neurosurgery in the United Kingdom (UK). The aim was to understand the early career clinical and research training journeys of potential future clinical academics, with a view to informing future policy and strategy to improve career development for academic neurosurgical trainees and consultants in the UK. Methods: An online survey from the Society of British Neurological Surgeons (SBNS) academic committee was distributed to both the SBNS and British Neurosurgical Trainee Association (BNTA) mailing lists in early 2022. Neurosurgical trainees for any period between 2007 and 2022 or who had done any dedicated academic or clinical academic placement were encouraged to complete the survey. Results: Sixty responses were received. Six (10%) were females and fifty-four (90%) were males. At the time of response, nine (15.0%) were clinical trainees, four (6.7%) were Academic Clinical Fellows (ACF), six (10.0%) were Academic Clinical Lecturers (ACL), four (6.7%) were post-CCT fellows, eight (13.3%) were NHS consultants, eight (13.3%) were academic consultants, eighteen (30.0%) were out of the programme (OOP) pursuing a PhD potentially returning to training, whilst three (5.0%) had left neurosurgery training entirely and no longer performing clinical neurosurgery. The mentorship was sought in most programmes, which tended to be informal. Self-reported success on a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being the most successful, was greatest in the MD and the “Other research degree/fellowship group” which does not include a PhD. There was a significant positive association between completing a PhD and having an academic consultant appointment (Pearson Chi-Square = 5.33, p = 0.021). Conclusions: This study provides a snapshot to better understand the opinions of academic training in neurosurgery within the UK. Establishing clear, modifiable, and achievable goals, as well as providing tools for research success, may contribute to the success of this nationwide academic training.

Type: Article
Title: Current landscape of academic neurosurgical training in the United Kingdom: analysis by the Society of British Neurological Surgeons
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/02688697.2023.2213329
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/02688697.2023.2213329
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10174138
Downloads since deposit
3Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item