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Associations of self-reported and device-assessed physical activity with fatigue, quality of life, and sleep quality in adults living with and beyond cancer

Lally, Phillippa; Miller, Natalie Ella; Lawrence, Claire; Beeken, Rebecca J; Fisher, Abigail; (2023) Associations of self-reported and device-assessed physical activity with fatigue, quality of life, and sleep quality in adults living with and beyond cancer. Journal of Sport and Health Science 10.1016/j.jshs.2023.05.001. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Greater physical activity is associated with improved outcomes in people living with and beyond cancer. However, most studies in exercise oncology use self-reported measures of physical activity. Few have explored agreement between self-reported and device-based measures of physical activity in people living with and beyond cancer. This study aimed to describe physical activity in adults affected by cancer across self-reported and device-assessed activity, to explore levels of agreement between these measures in terms of their utility for categorizing participants as meeting/not meeting physical activity guidelines, and to explore whether meeting guidelines is associated with fatigue, quality of life, and sleep quality. METHODS: A total of 1348 adults living with and beyond cancer from the Advancing Survivorship Cancer Outcomes Trial completed a survey assessing fatigue, quality of life, sleep quality, and physical activity. The Godin-Shephard Leisure-Time Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to calculate a Leisure Score Index (LSI) and an estimate of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Average daily steps and weekly aerobic steps were derived from pedometers worn by participants. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals meeting physical activity guidelines was 44.3% using LSI, 49.5% using MVPA, 10.8% using average daily steps, and 28.5% using weekly aerobic steps. Agreement (Cohen's κ) between self-reported and pedometer measures ranged from 0.13 (LSI vs. average daily steps) to 0.60 (LSI vs. MVPA). After adjusting for sociodemographic and health-related covariates, meeting activity guidelines using all measures was associated with not experiencing severe fatigue (odds ratios (ORs): 1.43-1.97). Meeting guidelines using MVPA was associated with no quality-of-life issues (OR = 1.53). Meeting guidelines using both self-reported measures were associated with good sleep quality (ORs: 1.33-1.40). CONCLUSION: Less than half of all adults affected by cancer are meeting physical activity guidelines, regardless of measure. Meeting guidelines is associated with lower fatigue across all measures. Associations with quality of life and sleep differ depending on measure. Future research should consider the impact of physical activity measure on findings, and where possible, use multiple measures.

Type: Article
Title: Associations of self-reported and device-assessed physical activity with fatigue, quality of life, and sleep quality in adults living with and beyond cancer
Location: China
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jshs.2023.05.001
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jshs.2023.05.001
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, see: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: Cancer survivorship, Fatigue, Physical activity, Quality of life, Sleep
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10171903
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