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Effect of different levels of acute hypoxia on subsequent oral glucose tolerance in males with overweight: A balanced cross-over pilot feasibility study

Corbett, Jo; Tipton, Michael J; Perissiou, Maria; James, Thomas; Young, John S; Newman, Alexander; Cummings, Michael; ... Shepherd, Anthony I; + view all (2023) Effect of different levels of acute hypoxia on subsequent oral glucose tolerance in males with overweight: A balanced cross-over pilot feasibility study. Physiological Reports , 11 (9) , Article e15623. 10.14814/phy2.15623. Green open access

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Abstract

Previous research has shown that ≤60 min hypoxic exposure improves subsequent glycaemic control, but the optimal level of hypoxia is unknown and data are lacking from individuals with overweight. We undertook a cross-over pilot feasibility study investigating the effect of 60-min prior resting exposure to different inspired oxygen fractions (CON FI O2  = 0.209; HIGH FI O2  = 0.155; VHIGH FI O2  = 0.125) on glycaemic control, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress during a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in males with overweight (mean (SD) BMI = 27.6 (1.3) kg/m2 ; n = 12). Feasibility was defined by exceeding predefined withdrawal criteria for peripheral blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 ), partial pressure of end-tidal oxygen or carbon dioxide and acute mountain sickness (AMS), and dyspnoea symptomology. Hypoxia reduced SpO2 in a stepwise manner (CON = 97(1)%; HIGH = 91(1)%; VHIGH = 81(3)%, p < 0.001), but did not affect peak plasma glucose concentration (CON = 7.5(1.8) mmol∙L-1 ; HIGH = 7.7(1.1) mmol∙L-1 ; VHIGH = 7.7(1.1) mmol∙L-1 ; p = 0.777; η2  = 0.013), plasma glucose area under the curve, insulin sensitivity, or metabolic clearance rate of glucose (p > 0.05). We observed no between-conditions differences in oxidative stress (p > 0.05), but dyspnoea and AMS symptoms increased in VHIGH (p < 0.05), with one participant meeting the withdrawal criteria. Acute HIGH or VHIGH exposure prior to an OGTT does not influence glucose homeostasis in males with overweight, but VHIGH is associated with adverse symptomology and reduced feasibility.

Type: Article
Title: Effect of different levels of acute hypoxia on subsequent oral glucose tolerance in males with overweight: A balanced cross-over pilot feasibility study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.14814/phy2.15623
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.15623
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Altitude, diabetes, environmental stress, metabolic disease, reduced oxygen, Male, Humans, Glucose Tolerance Test, Feasibility Studies, Blood Glucose, Insulin Resistance, Overweight, Hypoxia, Altitude Sickness, Oxygen, Acute Disease, Glucose, Dyspnea, Altitude
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10170193
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