UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Ongoing over-exploitation and delayed responses to environmental change highlight the urgency for action to promote vertebrate recoveries by 2030

Cornford, R; Spooner, F; McRae, L; Purvis, A; Freeman, R; (2023) Ongoing over-exploitation and delayed responses to environmental change highlight the urgency for action to promote vertebrate recoveries by 2030. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , 290 (1997) , Article 20230464. 10.1098/rspb.2023.0464. Green open access

[thumbnail of Ongoing over-exploitation and delayed responses to environmental change highlight the urgency for action to promote vertebra.pdf]
Preview
Text
Ongoing over-exploitation and delayed responses to environmental change highlight the urgency for action to promote vertebra.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

To safeguard nature, we must understand the drivers of biodiversity loss. Time-delayed biodiversity responses to environmental changes (ecological lags) are often absent from models of biodiversity change, despite their well-documented existence. We quantify how lagged responses to climate and land-use change have influenced mammal and bird populations around the world, while incorporating effects of direct exploitation and conservation interventions. Ecological lag duration varies between drivers, vertebrate classes and body size groupings-e.g. lags linked to climate-change impacts are 13 years for small birds, rising to 40 years for larger species. Past warming and land conversion generally combine to predict population declines; however, such conditions are associated with population increases for small mammals. Positive effects of management (>+4% annually for large mammals) and protected areas (>+6% annually for large birds) on population trends contrast with the negative impact of exploitation (<-7% annually for birds), highlighting the need to promote sustainable use. Model projections suggest a future with winners (e.g. large birds) and losers (e.g. medium-sized birds), with current/recent environmental change substantially influencing abundance trends to 2050. Without urgent action, including effective conservation interventions and promoting sustainable use, ambitious targets to stop declines by 2030 may already be slipping out of reach.

Type: Article
Title: Ongoing over-exploitation and delayed responses to environmental change highlight the urgency for action to promote vertebrate recoveries by 2030
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2023.0464
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2023.0464
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Living Planet Database, biodiversity change, ecological lags, population trends, vertebrates, Animals, Vertebrates, Biodiversity, Birds, Mammals, Climate Change, Ecosystem, Conservation of Natural Resources
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10169833
Downloads since deposit
79Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item