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Interventions to Modify Psychological Well-Being: Progress, Promises, and an Agenda for Future Research

Kubzansky, Laura D; Kim, Eric S; Boehm, Julia K; Davidson, Richard J; Huffman, Jeffrey C; Loucks, Eric B; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; ... Moskowitz, Judith T; + view all (2023) Interventions to Modify Psychological Well-Being: Progress, Promises, and an Agenda for Future Research. Affective Science , 4 pp. 174-184. 10.1007/s42761-022-00167-w. Green open access

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Abstract

Psychological well-being, characterized by feelings, cognitions, and strategies that are associated with positive functioning (including hedonic and eudaimonic well-being), has been linked with better physical health and greater longevity. Importantly, psychological well-being can be strengthened with interventions, providing a strategy for improving population health. But are the effects of well-being interventions meaningful, durable, and scalable enough to improve health at a population-level? To assess this possibility, a cross-disciplinary group of scholars convened to review current knowledge and develop a research agenda. Here we summarize and build on the key insights from this convening, which were: (1) existing interventions should continue to be adapted to achieve a large-enough effect to result in downstream improvements in psychological functioning and health, (2) research should determine the durability of interventions needed to drive population-level and lasting changes, (3) a shift from individual-level care and treatment to a public-health model of population-level prevention is needed and will require new infrastructure that can deliver interventions at scale, (4) interventions should be accessible and effective in racially, ethnically, and geographically diverse samples. A discussion examining the key future research questions follows.

Type: Article
Title: Interventions to Modify Psychological Well-Being: Progress, Promises, and an Agenda for Future Research
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s42761-022-00167-w
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1007/s42761-022-00167-w
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2023. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Health, Positive psychology, Psychological well-being
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10168893
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