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Is dynapenic abdominal obesity a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality? A competing risk analysis

Ramírez, Paula Camila; de Oliveira, Dayane Capra; de Oliveira Máximo, Roberta; de Souza, Aline Fernanda; Luiz, Mariane Marques; Delinocente, Maicon Luís Bicigo; Steptoe, Andrew; ... da Silva Alexandre, Tiago; + view all (2023) Is dynapenic abdominal obesity a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality? A competing risk analysis. Age Ageing , 52 (1) , Article afac301. 10.1093/ageing/afac301. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dynapenic abdominal obesity has been shown as a risk factor for all-cause mortality in older adults. However, there is no evidence on the association between this condition and cardiovascular mortality. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate whether dynapenic abdominal obesity is associated with cardiovascular mortality in individuals aged 50 and older. METHODS: A longitudinal study with an 8-year follow-up was conducted involving 7,030 participants of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing study. Abdominal obesity and dynapenia were respectively defined based on waist circumference (> 102 cm for men and > 88 cm for women) and grip strength (< 26 kg for men and < 16 kg for women). The sample was divided into four groups: non-dynapenic/non-abdominal obesity (ND/NAO), non-dynapenic/abdominal obesity (ND/AO), dynapenic/non-abdominal obesity (D/NAO) and dynapenic/abdominal obesity (D/AO). The outcome was cardiovascular mortality. The Fine-Grey regression model was used to estimate the risk of cardiovascular mortality as a function of abdominal obesity and dynapenia status in the presence of competing events controlled by socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical variables. RESULTS: The risk of cardiovascular mortality was significantly higher in individuals with D/AO compared with ND/NAO (SHR 1.85; 95% CI: 1.15-2.97). D/NAO was also associated with cardiovascular mortality (SHR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.08-2.44). CONCLUSION: Dynapenic abdominal obesity is associated with cardiovascular mortality, with a larger effect size compared to dynapenia alone in individuals older than 50 years. Thus, prevention strategies and clinical interventions that enable mitigating the harmful effects of these conditions should be adopted to diminish such risk.

Type: Article
Title: Is dynapenic abdominal obesity a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality? A competing risk analysis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afac301
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afac301
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. This is an Open Access ar ticle distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) study, abdominal obesity, cardiovascular disease, dynapenia, mortality, older people, Male, Humans, Female, Middle Aged, Aged, Longitudinal Studies, Obesity, Risk Factors, Obesity, Abdominal, Risk Assessment, Hand Strength, Cardiovascular Diseases
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10163312
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