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Social health and cognitive change in old age: the role of brain reserve

Marseglia, Anna; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Laukka, Erika J; Maddock, Jane; Patalay, Praveetha; Wang, Hui-Xin; Bäckman, Lars; ... on the behalf of the SHARED Consortium, .; + view all (2023) Social health and cognitive change in old age: the role of brain reserve. Annals of Neurology 10.1002/ana.26591. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Individual aspects of social health (SH; e.g. network, engagement, support) have been linked to cognitive health. However, their combined effect, and the role of the structural properties of the brain (brain reserve, BR) remain unclear. We investigated the interplay of SH and BR on cognitive change in older adults. METHODS: Within the Swedish National study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen, 368 dementia-free adults aged ≥60 years with baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging were followed over 12 years to assess cognitive change. A measure of global cognition was computed at each of the five waves of assessment by averaging domain-specific Z-scores for episodic memory, perceptual speed, semantic memory, letter and category fluency. An SH composite score was computed at baseline by combining leisure activities and social network. BR was proxied by total brain tissue volume (TBTV). Linear mixed models (adjusted for sociodemographic, vascular, and genetic factors) were used to estimate cognitive trajectories in relation to SH, TBTV. Interaction analysis and stratification were used to examine the interplay between SH and TBTV. RESULTS: Moderate-good SH (n=245; vs. poor; β-slope=0.01 [95% CI 0.002, 0.02]; p=0.018) and moderate-to-large TBTV (n=245; vs. small; β-slope=0.03 [95% CI 0.02, 0.04]; p<0.001) were separately associated with slower cognitive decline. In stratified analysis, moderate-good SH was associated with higher cognitive levels (but not change) only in participants with moderate-to-large TBTV (β-intercept=0.21 [95%CI 0.06; 0.37], p<0.01; interaction SH*TBTV p<0.05). INTERPRETATION: Our findings highlight the interplay between social health and brain reserve that likely unfolds throughout the entire life course to shape old-age cognitive outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Social health and cognitive change in old age: the role of brain reserve
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/ana.26591
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.26591
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2022 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10163042
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