UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

FcMBL magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS rapidly identifies paediatric blood stream infections from positive blood cultures

Kite, Kerry Anne; Loomba, Sahil; Elliott, Thomas J; Yongblah, Francis; Lightbown, Shanda L; Doyle, Thomas J; Gates, Lily; ... Cloutman-Green, Elaine; + view all (2022) FcMBL magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS rapidly identifies paediatric blood stream infections from positive blood cultures. PLOS ONE , 17 (11) , Article e0276777. 10.1371/journal.pone.0276777. Green open access

[thumbnail of journal.pone.0276777.pdf]
Preview
Text
journal.pone.0276777.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Rapid identification of potentially life-threatening blood stream infections (BSI) improves clinical outcomes, yet conventional blood culture (BC) identification methods require ~24-72 hours of liquid culture, plus 24-48 hours to generate single colonies on solid media suitable for identification by mass spectrometry (MS). Newer rapid centrifugation techniques, such as the Bruker MBT-Sepsityper® IVD, replace culturing on solid media and expedite the diagnosis of BCs but frequently demonstrate reduced sensitivity for identifying clinically significant Gram-positive bacterial or fungal infections. This study introduces a protocol that utilises the broad-range binding properties of an engineered version of mannose-binding lectin linked to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin (FcMBL) to capture and enrich pathogens combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS for enhanced infection identification in BCs. The FcMBL method identified 94.1% (64 of 68) of clinical BCs processed, with a high sensitivity for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria (94.7 and 93.2%, respectively). The FcMBL method identified more patient positive BCs than the Sepsityper® (25 of 25 vs 17 of 25), notably with 100% (3/3) sensitivity for clinical candidemia, compared to only 33% (1/3) for the Sepsityper®. Additionally, during inoculation experiments, the FcMBL method demonstrated a greater sensitivity, identifying 100% (24/24) of candida to genus level and 9/24 (37.5%) top species level compared to 70.8% (17/24) to genus and 6/24 to species (25%) using the Sepsityper®. This study demonstrates that capture and enrichment of samples using magnetic FcMBL-conjugated beads is superior to rapid centrifugation methods for identification of BCs by MALDI-TOF MS. Deploying the FcMBL method therefore offers potential clinical benefits in sensitivity and reduced turnaround times for BC diagnosis compared to the standard Sepsityper® kit, especially for fungal diagnosis.

Type: Article
Title: FcMBL magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOF MS rapidly identifies paediatric blood stream infections from positive blood cultures
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0276777
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0276777
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright: © 2022 Kite et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Blood, Candida albicans, Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, Yeast, Pneumococcus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Gram positive bacteria, Centrifugation
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10160810
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item