UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

One-Legged Balance Performance and Fall Risk in Mid and Later Life: Longitudinal Evidence From a British Birth Cohort

Blodgett, Joanna M; Hardy, Rebecca; Davis, Daniel; Peeters, Geeske; Kuh, Diana; Cooper, Rachel; (2022) One-Legged Balance Performance and Fall Risk in Mid and Later Life: Longitudinal Evidence From a British Birth Cohort. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 10.1016/j.amepre.2022.07.002. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of 1-s2.0-S0749379722003762-main.pdf] Text
1-s2.0-S0749379722003762-main.pdf - Published Version

Download (755kB)

Abstract

Introduction The one-legged balance test is widely used as a fall risk screening tool in both clinical and research settings. Despite rising fall prevalence in midlife, there is little evidence examining balance and fall risk in those aged <65 years. This study investigated the longitudinal associations between one-legged balance and the number of falls between ages 53 and 68 years. Methods The study included 2,046 individuals from the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health & Development, a British birth cohort study. One-legged balance times (eyes open, maximum: 30 seconds) were assessed at ages 53 years (1999) and 60–64 years (2006–2010). Fall history within the last year (none, 1, ≥2) was self-reported at ages 60–64 years and 68 years (2014). Multinomial logistic regressions assessed the associations between balance and change in balance with subsequent falls. Models adjusted for anthropometric, socioeconomic, behavioral, health status, and cognitive indicators. Analysis occurred between 2019 and 2022. Results Balance performance was not associated with single falls. Better balance performance at age 53 years was associated with decreased risk of recurrent falls at ages 60–64 years and 68 years, with similar associations between balance at age 60–64 years and recurrent falls at age 68 years. Those with consistently lower balance times (<15 seconds) were at greater risk (RRR=3.33, 95% CI=1.91, 5.80) of recurrent falls at age 68 years in adjusted models than those who could balance for 30 seconds at ages 53 years and 60–64 years. Conclusions Lower balance and consistently low or declining performance were associated with a greater subsequent risk of recurrent falls. Earlier identification and intervention of those with poor balance ability can help to minimize the risk of recurrent falls in aging adults.

Type: Article
Title: One-Legged Balance Performance and Fall Risk in Mid and Later Life: Longitudinal Evidence From a British Birth Cohort
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2022.07.002
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2022.07.002
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10154234
Downloads since deposit
8Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item