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Accelerated vascular aging: Ethnic differences in basilar artery length and diameter, and its association with cardiovascular risk factors and cerebral small vessel disease

Sudre, Carole H; Moriconi, Stefano; Rehwald, Rafael; Smith, Lorna; Tillin, Therese; Barnes, Josephine; Atkinson, David; ... Cardoso, M Jorge; + view all (2022) Accelerated vascular aging: Ethnic differences in basilar artery length and diameter, and its association with cardiovascular risk factors and cerebral small vessel disease. Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine , 9 , Article 939680. 10.3389/fcvm.2022.939680. Green open access

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Abstract

Background and aims: Risk of stroke and dementia is markedly higher in people of South Asian and African Caribbean descent than white Europeans in the UK. This is unexplained by cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF). We hypothesized this might indicate accelerated early vascular aging (EVA) and that EVA might account for stronger associations between cerebral large artery characteristics and markers of small vessel disease. Methods: 360 participants in a tri-ethnic population-based study (120 per ethnic group) underwent cerebral and vertebral MRI. Length and median diameter of the basilar artery (BA) were derived from Time of Flight images, while white matter hyperintensities (WMH) volumes were obtained from T1 and FLAIR images. Associations between BA characteristics and CVRF were assessed using multivariable linear regression. Partial correlation coefficients between WMH load and BA characteristics were calculated after adjustment for CVRF and other potential confounders. Results: BA diameter was strongly associated with age in South Asians (+11.3 μm/year 95% CI = [3.05; 19.62]; p = 0.008), with unconvincing relationships in African Caribbeans (3.4 μm/year [-5.26, 12.12]; p = 0.436) or Europeans (2.6 μm/year [-5.75, 10.87]; p = 0.543). BA length was associated with age in South Asians (+0.34 mm/year [0.02; 0.65]; p = 0.037) and African Caribbeans (+0.39 mm/year [0.12; 0.65]; p = 0.005) but not Europeans (+0.08 mm/year [-0.26; 0.41]; p = 0.653). BA diameter (rho = 0.210; p = 0.022) and length (rho = 0.261; p = 0.004) were associated with frontal WMH load in South Asians (persisting after multivariable adjustment for CVRF). Conclusions: Compared with Europeans, the basilar artery undergoes more accelerated EVA in South Asians and in African Caribbeans, albeit to a lesser extent. Such EVA may contribute to the higher burden of CSVD observed in South Asians and excess risk of stroke, vascular cognitive impairment and dementia observed in these ethnic groups.

Type: Article
Title: Accelerated vascular aging: Ethnic differences in basilar artery length and diameter, and its association with cardiovascular risk factors and cerebral small vessel disease
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fcvm.2022.939680
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2022.939680
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2022 Sudre, Moriconi, Rehwald, Smith, Tillin, Barnes, Atkinson, Ourselin, Chaturvedi, Hughes, Jäger and Cardoso. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems, Cardiovascular System & Cardiology, basilar artery (BA), white matter hyperintensities (WMH), aging, ethnicity, early vascular aging, cerebral small vessel disease, AMBULATORY BLOOD-PRESSURE, ISCHEMIC-STROKE, SOUTH ASIANS, CONSEQUENCES, ELONGATION, EUROPEANS, GREATER, STRESS, SABRE, SEX
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10153994
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