UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Reductions in hospital care among clinically vulnerable children aged 0-4 years during the COVID-19 pandemic

Etoori, David; Harron, Katie L; Mc Grath-Lone, Louise; Verfürden, Maximiliane L; Gilbert, Ruth; Blackburn, Ruth; (2022) Reductions in hospital care among clinically vulnerable children aged 0-4 years during the COVID-19 pandemic. Archives of Disease in Childchood 10.1136/archdischild-2021-323681. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Blackburn_Reductions in hospital care among clinically vulnerable children aged 0-4 years during the COVID-19 pandemic_AOP.pdf]
Preview
Text
Blackburn_Reductions in hospital care among clinically vulnerable children aged 0-4 years during the COVID-19 pandemic_AOP.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To quantify reductions in hospital care for clinically vulnerable children during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Birth cohort. SETTING: National Health Service hospitals in England. STUDY POPULATION: All children aged <5 years with a birth recorded in hospital administrative data (January 2010-March 2021). MAIN EXPOSURE: Clinical vulnerability defined by a chronic health condition, preterm birth (<37 weeks' gestation) or low birth weight (<2500 g). MAIN OUTCOMES: Reductions in care defined by predicted hospital contact rates for 2020, estimated from 2015 to 2019, minus observed rates per 1000 child years during the first year of the pandemic (March 2020-2021). RESULTS: Of 3 813 465 children, 17.7% (one in six) were clinically vulnerable (9.5% born preterm or low birth weight, 10.3% had a chronic condition). Reductions in hospital care during the pandemic were much higher for clinically vulnerable children than peers: respectively, outpatient attendances (314 vs 73 per 1000 child years), planned admissions (55 vs 10) and unplanned admissions (105 vs 79). Clinically vulnerable children accounted for 50.1% of the reduction in outpatient attendances, 55.0% in planned admissions and 32.8% in unplanned hospital admissions. During the pandemic, weekly rates of planned care returned to prepandemic levels for infants with chronic conditions but not older children. Reductions in care differed by ethnic group and level of deprivation. Virtual outpatient attendances increased from 3.2% to 24.8% during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: One in six clinically vulnerable children accounted for one-third to one half of the reduction in hospital care during the pandemic.

Type: Article
Title: Reductions in hospital care among clinically vulnerable children aged 0-4 years during the COVID-19 pandemic
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/archdischild-2021-323681
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2021-323681
Language: English
Additional information: © Author(s) (or their employer[s]) 2022. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Child Health, Covid-19, Health services research, Healthcare Disparities
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10150885
Downloads since deposit
21Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item