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The role of physical environmental characteristics and intellectual disability in conduct problem trajectories across childhood: A population-based Cohort study

Baird, Alister; Papachristou, Efstathios; Hassiotis, Angela; Flouri, Eirini; (2022) The role of physical environmental characteristics and intellectual disability in conduct problem trajectories across childhood: A population-based Cohort study. Environmental Research , 209 , Article 112837. 10.1016/j.envres.2022.112837.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The paucity of research investigating the role of the physical environment in the developmental progression of conduct problems and the potential moderating effects of intellectual disability (ID) is surprising, given the clinical relevance of elucidating environmental determinants of disruptive behaviours. AIMS: To use data from a large UK cohort study to assess associations between physical environmental exposures, ID, and conduct problem trajectories. METHOD: The sample included 8168 Millennium Cohort Study children (1.9% with ID). Multilevel growth curve modelling was used to examine the role of physical environment characteristics in the developmental trajectories of conduct problems after adjustments for ID status. RESULTS: Exposure to external environmental domains was not associated with differences in children's conduct problems across development. Alternatively, internal aspects of the household environment: spatial density (b = 0.40, p < .001) and damp problems (b = 0.14, p < .001) were both significantly associated with increased trajectories. Various individual and familial covariates were positively associated with conduct problems over time, including: presence of ID (b = 0.96, p < .001), autism spectrum disorder (b = 1.18, p < .001), male sex (b = 0.26, p < .001), poverty (b = 0.19, p < .001), maternal depression (b = 0.65, p < .001), and non-nuclear family structure (b = 0.35, p < .001). Positive ID status appeared to moderate the effects of internal household spatial density, reporting a non-linear negative association with spatial density and conduct problems across development (b = -1.08, p < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the potential harmful consequences of poor internal residential conditions on children's development of disruptive behaviours.

Type: Article
Title: The role of physical environmental characteristics and intellectual disability in conduct problem trajectories across childhood: A population-based Cohort study
Location: Netherlands
DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2022.112837
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2022.112837
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Conduct problems, Intellectual disability, Longitudinal birth cohort, Millennium cohort study, Physical environment
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10143453
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