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A systematic review of behaviour change techniques used in interventions to increase physical activity among breast cancer survivors

Hailey, V; Rojas-Garcia, A; Kassianos, AP; (2022) A systematic review of behaviour change techniques used in interventions to increase physical activity among breast cancer survivors. Breast Cancer 10.1007/s12282-021-01323-z. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite evidence that physical activity (PA) can help reduce recurrence and mortality, many breast cancer survivors are less active than recommended levels. The aim of this systematic review is to advance our understanding of which behaviour change techniques (BCTs) have been used in interventions promoting breast cancer survivors' PA and to evaluate their potential to increase PA. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in five databases (Medline; PsycInfo; Embase; CINAHL and Scopus) for studies published between 2005 and 2019. Following a rigorous screening process, 27 studies were retained. These were reviewed and analysed for quality, coded for BCTs (k = 0.65) and interventions categorised according to their potential to increase PA using an established methodology. RESULTS: The majority of studies were moderate quality (64%). Demonstration on how to perform the behaviour was the most commonly used BCT (n = 23). Adding objects to the environment, (pedometer or accelerometer) was the BCT with the highest potential to increase PA. This was followed by, goal setting and self-monitoring of behaviour. A theory-based approach to evaluation was used in only 59% (n = 16) of the studies. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this review inform which BCTs have the potential to increase PA for breast cancer survivors and inform intervention development. Future research, is encouraged to properly report intervention procedures around dose and frequency of intervention components to allow for review and replication.

Type: Article
Title: A systematic review of behaviour change techniques used in interventions to increase physical activity among breast cancer survivors
Location: Japan
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s12282-021-01323-z
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12282-021-01323-z
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Behaviour change techniques, Breast cancer, Exercise, Physical activity, Survivorship
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Applied Health Research
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10141474
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