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Burden of liver disease progression in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Mallet, V; Parlati, L; Martinino, A; Scarano Pereira, JP; Navas Jimenez, C; Sakka, M; Bouam, S; ... Demosthenes research group, .; + view all (2022) Burden of liver disease progression in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Journal of Hepatology , 76 (2) pp. 265-274. 10.1016/j.jhep.2021.09.030. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: There are uncertainties on the burden of liver disease in patients with type-2 diabetes (T2D). METHODS: We measured adjusted hazard ratios of liver disease progression to hepatocellular cancer and/or decompensated cirrhosis in a 2010-2020 retrospective, bicentric, longitudinal, cohort of 52,066 hospitalized patients with T2D. RESULTS: Mean age was 64±14 years and 58% were men. Alcohol use disorders accounted for 57% of liver-related complications and were associated with all liver-related risk factors. Non-metabolic liver-related risk factors accounted for 37% of the liver burden. T2D control was not associated with liver disease progression. The incidence (95% confidence interval) of liver-related complications and of competing mortality were 3.9 (3.5-4.3) and 27.8 (26.7-28.9) per 1000 person-years at risk, respectively. The cumulative incidence of liver disease progression exceeded the cumulative incidence of competing mortality only in the presence of a well-identified risk factors of liver disease progression, including alcohol use. The incidence of hepatocellular cancer was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.5) per 1000 person-year in patients with obesity and it increased with age. The adjusted hazard ratios of liver disease progression were 55.7 (40.5-76.6), 3.5 (2.3-5.2), 8.9 (6.9-11.5), and 1.5 (1.1-2.1), for alcoholic liver disease, alcohol use disorders without alcoholic liver disease, non-metabolic liver-related risk factors, and obesity, respectively. The attributable fractions of alcohol use disorders, non-metabolic liver risk-related risk factors, and obesity to the liver burden were 55%, 14%, and 7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this analysis of data from two hospital-based cohorts of patients with T2D, alcohol use disorders, rather than obesity, contributed to most of the liver burden. These results suggest that patients with T2D should be advised to drink minimal amounts of alcohol. LAY SUMMARY: • There is uncertainty on the burden of liver-related complications in patients with type-2 diabetes • We studied the risks of liver cancer and complications of liver disease in over 50,000 patients with type-2 diabetes • We found that alcohol was the main factor associated with complications of liver disease • This finding has major implications on the alcohol advice given to patients with type-2 diabetes.

Type: Article
Title: Burden of liver disease progression in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhep.2021.09.030
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2021.09.030
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Type-2 diabetes, alcohol use disorders, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10138485
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